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I have ARP head bolts already, so I can save the money. But I was wondering if I should get it over with. I already have Main Studs..
 

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how much boost are you going to run?
 

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exactly!
 

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I lost a head gasket shortly after going turbo with ARP head bolts. Switched to ARP head studs, no problem since.
 

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while you're at it get some header studs as that's another item worth investing in not only as you never have to worry about accidentally messing up the threads in the heads (yes rare but seen it happen to someone and not fun) but also solves 99.99% of any header leak bs. another one on that list are intake studs.
 

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What does everyone think about doing studs while the engine is already together? I have ARP head bolts right now but if I wanted to do studs, could I just take one out at a time and install them that way?
 

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I run head studs and main studs on everything I run. Cheap insurance for sure!
 

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What does everyone think about doing studs while the engine is already together? I have ARP head bolts right now but if I wanted to do studs, could I just take one out at a time and install them that way?

I wouldn't want to do that but you might be alright, 50/50 chance.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Be careful, on the passenger side you may not have clearance with the strut tower being in the way. It's pretty tight on that side trying to get the bottom studs in.
 

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ARP says the primary difference is in ease of assembly and accuracy of torquing.



HEAD STUDS vs. BOLTS...A TECHNICAL DISCUSSION ARP-bolts.com

ARP’s factory Tech Representatives are often asked which is better, cylinder head studs or bolts. The answer, invariably, depends on the installation. On many street-driven vehicles, where master cylinders and other items protrude into the engine compartment, it’s probably necessary to use head bolts so that the cylinder heads can be removed with the engine in the car.

For most applications, however, studs are recommended. And for good reason. Using studs will make it much easier to assemble an engine (especially a racing powerplant which must be serviced frequently and quickly!) with the cylinder head and gasket assured of proper alignment. Studs also provide more accurate and consistent torque loading.

Here’s why. When you use bolts to secure the head, the fastener is actually being “twisted” while it’s being torqued to the proper reading. Accordingly, the bolt is reacting to two different forces simultaneously. A stud should be installed in a “relaxed” mode – never crank it in tightly using a jammed nut. If everything is right, the stud should be installed finger tight. Then, when applying torque to the nut, the stud will stretch only on the vertical axis. Remember, an undercut shorter stud will have a rate similar to a longer, standard shank stud. This provides a more even clamping force on the head. Because the head gasket will compress upon initial torquing, make sure studs and bolts are re-torqued after the engine has been run.
 
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