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Discussion Starter #1
As you can see, I am not a welder. But, I am smart enough to use google.

Reason I ask, it seems it would make sense to weld a large nut into the bracket that a torque wrench with a large socket could be put on. Has anyone tried this?
 

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There are already a couple of 1/2" square holes in the tension bracket for a torque wrench or any 1/2" drive that you can fit in there. Why would you need a nut on there?
 

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You can't weld aluminum to steel.

That said, you can braze aluminum to steel using Silicon Bronze (CuSi-A...about 50k PSI Tensile) or Aluminum Bronze (CuAl-A2...70k PSI Tensile)...both are pretty strong. You don't need some obscure fancy rod.

That's all I can comment on as I'm not familiar with what you're looking to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There are already a couple of 1/2" square holes in the tension bracket for a torque wrench or any 1/2" drive that you can fit in there. Why would you need a nut on there?
because after years of tightening, those squares start to look like octagons.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You can't weld aluminum to steel.

That said, you can braze aluminum to steel using Silicon Bronze (CuSi-A...about 50k PSI Tensile) or Aluminum Bronze (CuAl-A2...70k PSI Tensile)...both are pretty strong. You don't need some obscure fancy rod.

That's all I can comment on as I'm not familiar with what you're looking to do.
I didn't figure a braze would hold.

Say I drill a hole in the tensioner. Then put a bolt through the hole, with a nut on the other side. In your personal opinion, do you think a braze would hold that bolt and nut in place enough for me to put 80-90lbs of torque on it?
 

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TrimDrip said:
I didn't figure a braze would hold.

Say I drill a hole in the tensioner. Then put a bolt through the hole, with a nut on the other side. In your personal opinion, do you think a braze would hold that bolt and nut in place enough for me to put 80-90lbs of torque on it?
I'm not familiar with what you're trying to do, but I think you're asking if you Tig brazed a nut to a piece of aluminum would the braze break if you applied 90ft lbs of torque?

If you already have the welder, try it on a test piece...I'd sure as hell like to know the answer. Time to do some testing...should only take a few minutes. The bigger the nut, the more surface area you have to braze...the bigger the gob, the better the job!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I personally don't think a braze would do it.

If the hole was stamped in the aluminum in the shape of a hexagon like the boogered up square holes in the pic below, that would allow a very long nut to fit perfectly through, I would give it a shot. There is room for that directly next to the tensioner in this pic.

 

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Silicon bronze rod melts about 600* higher than aluminum. I'm not even sure that particular aluminum is weldable, but I sure as heck wouldn't try it. If that nut breaks loose at 90 ft-lb, a whole lot of damage could happen to you or your car. If it was me, I'd get rid of the manual tensioner completely (my car's got $1,000 worth of body/paint damage from running a manual tensioner - which is why I don't run one anymore (and no more problems)). If you want to try to make that thing work, either tig weld on some aluminum hex stock (again, not sure what aluminum you're working with there), or make it easy on yourself, and just re-make that plate out of steel - you can go thinner with steel (it's stiffer than aluminum). Then you can tig on a nut and it won't break. In that instance, I would take a short piece of hex stock (or make one), turn down part of it down so it's round, drill a hole in the plate and tig it in from the front and back.

But I've always taken a dislike to vortech's design - seems half-assed, at best.

Oh, I forgot to add, with a spring tensioner I can use less than half the tension and get zero belt slip - 80lbs is enough. I had to be at 180 on the manual setup, and I still saw some slip. Here's what a manual tensioned belt looks like on the dyno:


Absolutely no control of the belt under load.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Silicon bronze rod melts about 600* higher than aluminum. I'm not even sure that particular aluminum is weldable, but I sure as heck wouldn't try it. If that nut breaks loose at 90 ft-lb, a whole lot of damage could happen to you or your car. If it was me, I'd get rid of the manual tensioner completely (my car's got $1,000 worth of body/paint damage from running a manual tensioner - which is why I don't run one anymore (and no more problems)). If you want to try to make that thing work, either tig weld on some aluminum hex stock (again, not sure what aluminum you're working with there), or make it easy on yourself, and just re-make that plate out of steel - you can go thinner with steel (it's stiffer than aluminum). Then you can tig on a nut and it won't break. In that instance, I would take a short piece of hex stock (or make one), turn down part of it down so it's round, drill a hole in the plate and tig it in from the front and back.

But I've always taken a dislike to vortech's design - seems half-assed, at best.

Oh, I forgot to add, with a spring tensioner I can use less than half the tension and get zero belt slip - 80lbs is enough. I had to be at 180 on the manual setup, and I still saw some slip. Here's what a manual tensioned belt looks like on the dyno:

https://youtu.be/a4k6i9AEHyo

Absolutely no control of the belt under load.
thanks man! i don't why I just didn't think to make one out of steel. And I will look into a spring tensioner. I guess any of them that supply the pressure will work eh

And is that your set-up in the video? I for sure want one. I am moving to Nor. Cal. soon, and I assume that is illegal but, I for sure want one for the shelf.

edit: I would have to find a way to keep air though. It gets tough in the South
 

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If youve got enough space behind the bracket, you could use two bolts through the tensioning holes, with a welded strap between them so they cant spin. Easier than fabbing a new plate from steel if you want a quick fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If youve got enough space behind the bracket, you could use two bolts through the tensioning holes, with a welded strap between them so they cant spin. Easier than fabbing a new plate from steel if you want a quick fix.
that is a solid idea as well. good thinking
 
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