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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I'm pretty sure that this hasen't been answered before, but if it has I apologize for not looking up any older threads. Is there any difference between racing shoes? The reason I ask is that my fiance accidentaly got me a pair of the oakley karting shoes instead of the mid tops. I've never had racing shoes before so I don't know what I'm suposed to be looking for. And I just wanted to know if anyone in here was going to go to the Grand Am cup here in Daytona this 27th, I believe, or to the Rolex 24 hr's.

Oh, and do i need a roll cage to mount corbeau racing seats and 5 point harnesses? I understand that seats might not need one, but the harnesses I'm not too sure of. Thanks.
 

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My biggest concern when looking for a driving shoe was a rounded heel pad for consistent easy pedal actuation.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The whole point of the shoes is to feel all the vibrations through the pedal to pick up any input from the vehicle itself right? So as long as it has a soft sole it should be ok as long as it has some good grip. I don't know of any stores around here where I could go and try something like this on too. I guess it's just a trial and error thing. Thanks though.
 

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If you do racing seats, don't keep the stock belts. If you do harnesses, you need a rollbar of some sort to keep the belts at the right height. If you put all of that in, delete your airbags.
 

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I suspect the difference in the shoes is that the kart shoe doesn't have the fire protection that a car shoe has. For practical purposes it wouldn't matter (unless your car catches on fire, then it could matter....). Just a guess though. If they fit and you can work the pedals like you want I'd use them.

David
 

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SCCARACERGT said:
The whole point of the shoes is to feel all the vibrations through the pedal to pick up any input from the vehicle itself right? So as long as it has a soft sole it should be ok as long as it has some good grip. I don't know of any stores around here where I could go and try something like this on too. I guess it's just a trial and error thing. Thanks though.
No, that's not the whole point of them. They tend to be narrow for good access to individual pedals in a narrow footbox, laterally stiff for good heel & toe, fire retardent in some cases, and as I said, the heel is usually specially designed to provide good padding behind your heel, the part that rests on the floor of the car, as well as providing a good surface for your heel to roll on as you actuate the pedals. I used to use old Chuck Taylor high-tops as driving shoes for the narrowness and lightness in formula cars, and regular street tennis/running shoes at other times, let me tell you, the difference in comfort and fatigue resistance when I want to an actual driving shoe (G-Force in my case) is beyond night and day.
 

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Look for a nice rounded heel. Make sure it is comfortable and allows good circulation. Karting shoes are not fire retardant. Looking for a SFI tag is a good idea.
SCCA doesn't require a SFI rating-
GCR Rule 17.23.8
"Shoes with uppers of leather and/or nonflammable material that at a minimum cover the instep. Ventilation pinholes by the manufacturer are allowed."

I like the Finish Line Race Wear shoes.

Only race shoe manufactured in North America
Skilled craftsman in the footwear business since 1921.
Meets or exceeds SFI certification. SFI tags applied.
Top grain, premium suede or polished leather construction.
Double stitch construction in stress areas of the shoe.
Radiantex membrane between the bottom of the shoe and the sole to reflect heat from any exterior head source.
R type poly urethane "constant grip" pattern sole.
Race shoe incorporates a wear, pattern materials on the outer, frontal area of the foot where excessive wear generally occurs. The sole of the shoe is extended backwards and up over the back side of the heel to provide a "rocker area" for the foot.
Ergonomically designed and constructed, to provide positive foot feel and comfort while racing as well as comfort while walking in the pits.
Safety, Quality, Comfort & Design Engineered.

They aren't as flashy or cool as the Puma, Oakley, or Alpinestar, but they work just as well and are cheaper and comfortable.
 

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MFE said:
No, that's not the whole point of them. They tend to be narrow for good access to individual pedals in a narrow footbox. . .

Too true, unfortunately for those of us who wear 12EEE in normal shoes, since we're not likely to drive a Lotus anyway.

Sat in a Lotus 7 once, I could easily cover all three pedals with one foot and could not cover less than two without dislocating my ankle.
 

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rfloz said:
Too true, unfortunately for those of us who wear 12EEE in normal shoes, since we're not likely to drive a Lotus anyway.
People with 12EEE shoes don't need a brake pedal.

A hole in the floorboard and braking a la Fred Flintstone would still put the front license plate into the asphalt.
 

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SteveL1994 said:
People with 12EEE shoes don't need a brake pedal.

A hole in the floorboard and braking a la Fred Flintstone would still put the front license plate into the asphalt.
:rofl: Dont know if they still do, or if these are even any good, but Journeys the shoe store used to see some adidas racing shoes. Just a thought.
 

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racrboy1987 said:
:rofl: Dont know if they still do, or if these are even any good, but Journeys the shoe store used to see some adidas racing shoes. Just a thought.
I am actually thinking of getting a set of those Adidas/Goodyear race shoes. I have a couple friends that bought some Pumas and they say they like them, but they look too narrow for me. I use the roll method for rev matching when downshifting and a little width could help. The Adidas are a little bit wider than the Pumas, which are very narrow.
 

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rfloz said:
Too true, unfortunately for those of us who wear 12EEE in normal shoes, since we're not likely to drive a Lotus anyway.

Sat in a Lotus 7 once, I could easily cover all three pedals with one foot and could not cover less than two without dislocating my ankle.
Is Lotus some foreign language translation for "little footbox?"
I cannot drive an Elise without removing shoes, and it still takes some fancy footwork.
 
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