Ford Mustang Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know I've seen some cars running turbo's off cummins diesels and other diesel trucks and even tractors but I was curious to see if anyone had heard of someone trying to setup a system with the variable geometry turbo's now on some of these new diesels
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,893 Posts
The issue with the newer turbos is that the system that actuates the variable parts...isn't often simple. The older style VNT/VGT turbos usually used some mechanical linkage to actuate whatever changed the geometry of the parts...however the newer systems seem to have electronic systems that are computer controlled and often complex without datasheets it would be difficult to utilize.

Not sure how Ford or GM's system is but the Holsets have electronic systems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I wasn't quite sure if the turbo's expansion/contraction was mechanical or electronically controlled. It makes my head hurt just thinking about trying to set one up, however if you actually could make it work, it would be pretty unique, like having the perfect size turbo for all rpm's. I'm not really sure if all the work would be worth the reward if it's even possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
the VNT turbos were used for a few years on 89-90 turbo dodges and often proved problematic, as the system used to control the vanes usually ran into issues once you put some miles on it.. being into the FWD turbo dodges myself i can tell you most guys who have vnt cars typically convert to conventional turbos at some point. in this day and age, you can get a conventional turbo to be as responsive as needed with very little lag
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Now-a-days variable geometry turbos are computer controlled. Theres an electronic actuator in place of the waste gate that moves the veins over the impeller. Being a Cummins diesel tech for Chrysler I can tell you first hand there are better ways to achieve less lag. Plus with improved impeller design, dual ball bearing cartridge's, and titanium compressor wheels, turbos today are made way better than before and how much lag you'll see is really determined by how you match the turbo to your engine. Example - Precision's Ball bearing PT76 (will spool a little under 2500rpm with good heads, cam and intake on a stock displacement motor.

Thats not even getting into possessors, stand alones, or piggy back systems. Find one with an anti-lag and two-step feature and you'll leave out of the hole with boost.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top