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Pretty much as you would before taking a road trip:
Decent tires, good brakes, clean windshield, check fluids.
The only minor diff is there's 101 opinions on what psi you should start with on the tires. lol
The pre-track inspection will look for fluid leaks, tire wear bars, operating brake lights & seat belts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Sounds easy enough. Going to be using the Homestead Speedway road course in South Florida.
 

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Start with fresh set of brake pads and be sure to bring a spare set with you.

Flush the entire brake system , you want fresh brake fluid, since boiling brake fluid is a common problem for newbies.

Tires should be less the 3 years old and be without repairs.

All lugs nuts need to be torqued to manufacture specs.

Suspension and steering components must be inspected and be in perfect working order.

been addicted for over 15 years, this may be your first but very sure not your last
 

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Tires should be less the 3 years old and be without repairs.
Try not to run new tires. The more miles the tires have, the better. tires with significant tread are much easier to ovberheat and when this happens, the rubber dends to get ripped off. This is called "chunking".

the tread flexes under the load, which generates heat. Tall tread blocks not only flex more, but they tend to hold the heat inside the tread block instead of letting it dissapate into the tire's carcass. If the get too hot, the rubber breaks down, softens and gets ripped off the tire by the road surface.

Not good.
 

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Try not to run new tires. The more miles the tires have, the better. tires with significant tread are much easier to ovberheat and when this happens, the rubber dends to get ripped off. This is called "chunking".

the tread flexes under the load, which generates heat. Tall tread blocks not only flex more, but they tend to hold the heat inside the tread block instead of letting it dissapate into the tire's carcass. If the get too hot, the rubber breaks down, softens and gets ripped off the tire by the road surface.

Not good.
Very true, also, while the tires should be in good shape (no belts and no dry-rotting) if you have any serious brakes on a car with no abs (you didn't say what year your car was), you're going to find the lockup point before you find your max-braking-without-lockup-point, meaning you'll chunk treadblocks off of/flatspot the tire that way.

I attended my second event on a new set of expensive Yokahamas and I promptly found the lockup point on the RF of the car. I woulda rather have found that point with a set of slightly used tires than a brand new $210 a piece tire that was essentially ruined in one day.
 

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For your first time, you're probably going to be going slowly enough that it won't matter much what brake pads or fluid you use. You'll be driving very gently and learning the line.

However, if you've got any related experience (karts, auto-x, etc.) and think you might be ready to push things a little on the first day, brake fluid with a fairly high boiling point and a set of fairly aggressive pads wouldn't be out of the question.

Are you planning on doing multiple events this year? If you've got 3-4 plans, you'll probably find that by the 3rd or 4th event you'll be hitting the limit of stock pads. Even if you're not getting pad fade, you'll start eating pads very quickly.

Clint
 

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Start with the links in the FAQ's at the top of the page.
 
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