Ford Mustang Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Tried reverse searing a bone-in ribeye and filet mignon a few weeks ago and now I'm hooked. I've done regular cast iron and grill cooking but never tried it this way and was very impressed with the turnout of both steaks. My ribeye could have come out of the oven a couple minutes sooner but it was still amazing!

Seasoned


After 30 minutes in a 275 degree oven


Seared in a hot cast iron for about 1-1.5 minutes each side with butter. I should have left it in the pan a bit longer to get an even better crust


After resting for at least 5 minutes and cut open


Filet done for my wife in the same way but a little longer in the cast iron and it was PERFECT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,205 Posts
It ain't burnt what the hell.

I switched a reverse sear on my grilling a few years ago. Low and slow on the grill at first then over high heat sear at the finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,955 Posts
You gents have waaaayy too much time on your hand..
If I even eat dinner I give myself 30-45 minutes to cook, eat and clean up then back to working on projects.

ks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
Hmm, might have to try this.
I've just cooked my steak at medium-high heat on the grill for a certain number of minutes per side(depending on cut and thickness).
I do like a nice crust on the outside of a steak and throw in some butter, yummy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Makes my mouth water. So what is the process of reverse searing? Can you post it?
Let the steak(s) sit at room temp for about 20-30 minutes. Might as well pull out some butter and let it sit as well. Bring your oven to 275 degrees. Light coat of olive oil (or other oil) on the meat and lay on the sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper to how ever much you prefer. Place the steak on a cooling rack sitting on a regular baking tray. Keeping the meat from touching the pan helps it cook more evenly.

My ribeye was around 1 1/2" thick and baked it right at about 30-31 minutes and it the final product ended up at medium-ish. Should have taken it out a couple minutes sooner. The filet was 30 minutes even because it was around 2" thick and it came out to near perfect medium rare.

LET. THEM. REST. Don't go straight from the oven directly in the pan or it won't come out right. While the meat rests for 5 minutes, get your cast iron (or whatever you have available) on high heat because you want it HOT. Lay the steak on the pan and around 60 seconds, put in 4-5 tablespoons of butter. Once the butter finishes melting, flip the steak and start spooning the melted butter over the top...should coat it 3-4 times over the next 60 seconds. Flip again and repeat basting it with the butter. Flip one more time and baste with butter. Move the steak to a plate and let it rest again. I let mine rest for about 6-7 minutes before cutting it and it didn't leak out all of the juicy goodness!

Enjoy!

You boys must not know about sous vide
I've definitely heard of it, just haven't had a chance to try it because I don't have one of the devices to maintain water temp and I don't feel like trying to gauge it on my own with our stove top when reverse searing worked out so well for me already. I might try sous vide one of these days though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
I've definitely heard of it, just haven't had a chance to try it because I don't have one of the devices to maintain water temp and I don't feel like trying to gauge it on my own with our stove top when reverse searing worked out so well for me already. I might try sous vide one of these days though.
Yeah, we got a precision cooker (general name for those devices) as a Christmas gift and just use it in a big bowl or pot. At first I thought it was some pansy little way of cooking meat but myyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy gawwdddd man it makes a ridiculous difference. beef, chicken pork tenderloin, anything. We still sear on the cast iron after cooking of course but the amount of flavor and the consistency of the meat is awesome. you basically lock the steak in an vacuumed bag full of seasoning/butter/marinade/whatever and lock all of that flavor and juice into the meat as it cooks. it also cooks evenly because it's completely submerged.

If I don't have the 1.5hrs it takes from start to finish though, I like doing something like what you outlined above. Broiling also works pretty well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Got the same steaks and made them the same way again but slightly different...pulled mine a couple minutes earlier than before and cooked in the pan a couple minutes longer and it was PERFECT. No pics because I couldn't think straight, just needed to eat it lol!

Cooked wifes filet a couple extra minutes and it was the exact doneness she wants this time. She practically pulled the chunk off without much help from the knife.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
I'm buying a whole cow this July from a co-worker who raises cattle. No steroids or anti-biotics. Only grain fed. Can't wait. Gotta make some room in my freezer. LOL!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
I'm buying a whole cow this July from a co-worker who raises cattle. No steroids or anti-biotics. Only grain fed. Can't wait. Gotta make some room in my freezer. LOL!!!
We have some as well. It can be a good or bad thing depending on how the cattle is raised and fed. Ours are typically leaner and you get a little different flavor from them so the steaks don't always come out spectacular unless you really go through a rigorous preparation and cooking process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
I’ve done something similar. It does make a great steak that’s for sure. I had a ribeye last night. I love trying new ways to cook steak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
If it ain't grilled over charcoal, it ain't no good. And yes I've done it every imaginable way. Grilled over a sand pit lined with firewood of different kinds, in the oven, reverse seared, butter coated you name it. Baste with olive oil, sprinkle salt & pepper over it, go get the grill ready....by time it's ready, the steaks are itchin' to get on the grill.

I'm with Kevin$ on this one too. If it takes more than a shake of a sheep's tail, it's taking me away from shop time....no kids no wife, I'd rather be in the shop working on something than slaving in the kitchen. But I'll take a few minutes once in a while for a good steak.

Big thing about beef is that store-bought usually don't hold a candle to fresh steak. When I say fresh, I mean like a day or two at the most. I get them locally from a farm that actually butchers when they get enough orders...and they do it all right there...I get my ribeyes or sirloins within hours of butchering and don't freeze 'em. Cook 'em up that day usually. He's gotten into hogs as of recently but they're not big enough yet for butcher (they want them to be around 450-500 lb) and I can't wait. Fresh bacon and fresh pork steaks & chops.

Before I moved, I had a place out in the sticks that I'd do my own butchering. Usually holidays. Used to go to the auction and buy a hog right around Memorial day, fatten it up and by time Thanksgiving came around, it was ready. Woke the neighbors up many times with the rifle. Sold a lot of the meat and kept what I needed for family dinner, and it was absolutely delicious. Very seldomly I'd go turkey hunting and we'd have wild turkey, but as I said, it was seldom. Now I live in a neighborhood (a country neighborhood...) and really don't think it's a great idea to raise/kill/butcher a hog with the yuppie neighbor's kids watching my every move. On second thought...maybe they'll learn something. Hmm....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I'm buying a whole cow this July from a co-worker who raises cattle. No steroids or anti-biotics. Only grain fed. Can't wait. Gotta make some room in my freezer. LOL!!!

My son bought a whole cow for us and it wound up being 630bs of meat. I bought 2 freezers because I didn't know how much meat it was going to be before we had to go and get it. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Do not fear the yuppies. The kids need to know where their food comes from. I ended up in city as chef after military. Left back to boonies and opened a hog and poultry farm with butcher shop ( cows coming soon) and even the yuppies kids that moved out this way have gotten into the whole deal. So go for it.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top