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We all know that with our fox mustangs (other models as well, most likely) that the front ride height should be set with the front control arms being parallel to the ground. Now is there a "sweet spot" for rear ride height for maximum cornering grip ? I'm no expert but I know with the rear and the stick axle, there's all sorts of things that come into play for launching grip vs cornering grip. (anti-squat, pinion angle, etc etc etc)

My rear sits a little higher than the front, and that because I didn't want to rub the slicks at the track, so recently I've re-rolled, and hammered the rear fenders out a bit more and lowered the rear just a tad. Now I'm searching for the perfect height for maximum cornering grip. Im not to concerned with launch grip because of torque arm, low or stock horsepower, and 275 tyres, I'm completely focused on keeping the rear tame at corner entry/mid/exit.

setup: MM catalog, TA/PHB/ no rear swaybar as per MM suggestions, 275 Nitto NT01


Thanks in advance
 

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You should be able to find a race shop within reasonable distance that has a set of four corner scales. They will be able to adjust everything and get your corner weighting on the mark. That will give you the best balance/ cornering grip.
 

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I doubt that there's any universally 'perfect' height, because of the LCAs inclination influence on rear axle roll steer. And driver preference seems to vary quite a bit on how much roll steer is desirable, even for track use.

PHB height and LCA convergence in plan view are also involved, and the amount of roll steer can be calculated as a percentage of the number of degrees that the car is rolling over to.

For a car that's mostly street-driven, somewhere between about 3% and 5% axle steer in the understeer direction seems to be a good range to be in. Basically stable without any surprises or noticeable sluggishness. With a TA/PHB-equipped Fox or SN95, levelled LCAs probably gets you close, but you won't want them running any more than just barely 'uphill' going from axle to chassis. Above about 8% - 10% LCAs clearly running 'downhill') the car starts not wanting to do slalom maneuvers. Below 0% (LCA inclination too far uphill) is oversteerish axle steer which can be a bit tricky to deal with in sudden avoidance maneuvers on the street.


Norm
 
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