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Discussion Starter #1
I'll be putting the finishing touches on my suspension mods (for now) over the next few weeks and then it is time to move on to something else. I'm not ready to start my engine sway just yet, so I'm thinking that it might be time to look at the rear axle.

I think one of the axle seals may be going bad due to the fact that I see evidence of fluid on the axle originating from or around the rear differential. I'm also getting a fair amount of one wheel peel out of the rear diff. I'd like to try and do it once and move on. I believe that to replace the axles seals you have to remove the rear diff anyway. Is that true. Anyone have any good resources on this? I'm also thinking of going to an aftermarket LSD. I'm not really sure what I want but at this point I am leaning towards a Detroit True Trac. The price seems reasonable and it looks like it should be a durable unit due to the fact that it is a helical gear unit. Long term durability/reliability are import as is not having to open the diff every season to repack clutches. I think the Quafie (sp?) units are reported to be ultra durable but unless I am mistaken they are in the $1100-1300 range. That would put them out of my consideration. I'm not 100% familiar with torque bias and how it works so that could be a deciding factor. The majority of my use would be in an auto cross and possibly open track setting (in the near future). I'm definitely interested in putting as much power down as possible. From what I've read some units will "push" more than other if they don't allow for a wider range of traction between wheels. I'm not sure if this is the best option and then tune the suspension around it or if you select a unit with a larger "spread" to allow a little more spin rather than just make the car plow. I better stop before I get to rambling because I am looking for advise and I honestly don't have much knowledge in this area.
 

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Just for referrence, the axle seals are at each end of the axle tubes. They are directly behind the backing plate or caliper mount depending on which type of brakes you have.

You may be refering to the pinion seal which is at the front of the diff where the yoke is mounted. Only other place I could see it leaking from would be the diff cover gasket or drain/fill plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just for referrence, the axle seals are at each end of the axle tubes. They are directly behind the backing plate or caliper mount depending on which type of brakes you have.

You may be refering to the pinion seal which is at the front of the diff where the yoke is mounted. Only other place I could see it leaking from would be the diff cover gasket or drain/fill plug.
There is some slight leaking around the cover but it looks like there is some leaking around the housing where the axles go into the pumpkin. I was assuming there is some kind of seal there but it is possible that it is coming from the pinion seal and getting slung around. I guess I will get a better look once we get in there. Trying to get my ducks in a row in regard to ordering a seal/bearing kit and a new diff, but I'm still researching options on the latter.
 

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Is this a solid axle or IRS car you are having problems with?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Solid axle

I wouldn't necessarily say I'm having problems. Everything still works fine. Just thinking of changing diffs and while I'm in there performing some general housekeeping if needed.
 

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Just rebuild the diff, its easy! I did mine on the ground, and even left the diff in the car while I did it.

Took a couple tries to get the spider gears lined up and everything back together, but well worth the difference it made!

I used the carbon fiber friction plates from the 03-04 Cobras, and used a couple of my friction plates that were still good to stack it all together nice and tight.

If you replace the outer seals, its a good time to replace the bearings as well. You can rent a slide hammer for free to remove both of these parts. Bearings are a good idea, because when they start to go bad they will scar the axles where the bearing rides, and make quite a bit of noise.

Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just rebuild the diff, its easy! I did mine on the ground, and even left the diff in the car while I did it
Rebiulding the traklok once a year at just over $100 a pop just doesn't sound like fun. Sounds like the diff wears quickly enough to need constant rebuilds under race conditions
 

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Rebiulding the traklok once a year at just over $100 a pop just doesn't sound like fun. Sounds like the diff wears quickly enough to need constant rebuilds under race conditions
Race conditions maybe, but I daily drove my car(hard) and raced it on the weekends and it held up for over 6 years before it started to 1-wheel peel :king:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That sounds like a good experience on your end. What kind of racing and what kind of tires?

Mine would be mostly autox probably the equivalent of 20 four run events, not counting schools and test and tunes. Hopefully at least two lapping days this year.
 

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That sounds like a good experience on your end. What kind of racing and what kind of tires?

Mine would be mostly autox probably the equivalent of 20 four run events, not counting schools and test and tunes. Hopefully at least two lapping days this year.
It was mainly drag racing, on street tires, drag radials, and ET Streets. I lived in a college town with ####ty streets, so I also did a lot of sideways drifting action as well....damn hooligan! :evilgrin:

Basically, if money IS an option, you can rebuild your Trak-Lok with it in the car, also saving you the hassle of shimming the differential to make sure you h ave quiet, even gear wear.

Best of luck!
 

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As far as getting those axle bearings and seals out, you can use a long pipe and a hammer - axle mounted in the car. I used standard plumbers fair with a big coller on one end; knocked those bearings and seals out with very little effort. However, I'd prefer a five-pound slide hammer with the Eastwood et al bearing puller adaptor - only an order of magnitude or two more expensive than the pipe.
 
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