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Discussion Starter #1
They are on sale for $90 each so I decided to give them a try. Are they likely to run significantly cooler than the OEM style due to the curved vains?
 

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If the diameter, thickness or material are significantly different -- then you might see a significant temp difference. But curved VANES vs. straight vanes won't make that much difference.

Vain and Vein and Vane are 3 different things.....
 

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IMHO the curved vanes make for a more effective air pump, if they're mounted correctly. Whether that makes a practical difference on an actual track? Probably not enough to be conclusive. I do think they'll resist radial cracking a little better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If the diameter, thickness or material are significantly different -- then you might see a significant temp difference. But curves VANES vs. straight vanes won't make that much difference.

Vain and Vein and Vane are 3 different things.....
Sorry professor. You must really be smart to figure out what I was talking about since I mispelled "vane".
 

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You could point out that he misspelled "curved" as "curves". But then he might point out that you misspelled "misspelled." :p
 

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Corvettes come with curved vane rotors and they crack rotors like there is no tomorrow from what I've heard. I haven't tracked mine so I can't say for sure but the word on the forum is they go through stock or NAPA brand rotors almost every event.

Of course they also crack hubs on a regular basis. Thank goodness our Mustangs aren't as fragile.
 

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From my experience cracking rotors had more to do with a particular rotor's applicability in a racing application vs. a high performance street application. The cracking is usually a function of the rotor's ability to effectively (or ineffectively as the case may be) deal with the thermal load you're asking it to deal with. If the rules in the class you run will let you -- there's probably a rotor/caliper/wheel size combo that will work without cracking. Rules/finances usually dictate whether you can solve the problem that way. Otherwise - you experiment with the different choice and tell us what happened.

As for your spelling j rick -- I was just trying to help you out. Not a day goes by that I don't learn something new. And now you're clear on 'vanes'. You're welcome. ;)

Patrick - thanks for catching my typo! Fixed now as you suggested and I intended.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You could point out that he misspelled "curved" as "curves". But then he might point out that you misspelled "misspelled." :p
I think I need to go back to elementary school.
 

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Great question Rick. I agree with the general consensus that the difference is fairly small. There are so many other subtleties of the rotor design that can add up to significant differences in cooling and performance. During my Ford years as the Mustang brake development engineer I was fortunate enough to work closely with Brembo. The intricacies that go into a properly designed rotor are interesting and numerous. The Brembo designs have proper radii transitioning from each of the pillars to the braking plates and even the inside surface of the braking plates have an intentional slight convex shape to them. The area inside the hat where the air enters is carefully controlled and designed for air flow. Another interesting aspect of rotor design that Brembo has excelled at is thermal distortion. Due to the hat shape of most rotors, they are prone to "coning" as they heat up. As the rotor heats up it needs to expand radially. It is however constrained by the hat section which causes the rotor to distort conically. Excessive coning will add to premature cracking in the outer plate as the rotor returns to it's cooled shape. We (at Ford) learned this when we designed the '94 13" Cobra rotor. We literally copied the existing Kelsey-Hayes Corvette rotor and simply changed the offset (and bolt pattern & center bore) without any concern for the hat shape. We unfortunately reduced the offset by 11. some-odd millimeters which further constrained the rotor during thermal expansion creating a poorly designed rotor. We suffered with this design until Brembo came along with their "swan neck" hat design rotor that we put in production for '99. Those of us that have experienced both rotors would surely agree that the properly designed Brembo rotor is far superior to the archaic Kelsy-Hayes design. Does this mean that pillars are better than vanes? I don't think so. I do think that components as thoroughly engineered as Brembo go a long way though.
 
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