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Discussion Starter #1
I'm almost done my budget build and noticed today that my tie rods are not even close to being aligned with my A Arms. I was going to get a bump steer kit from MM, but I don't have money for the gauge. Would it be worth buying the kit (no gauge) and just adjusting my tie rods so they sit parallel with my A Arms?
Thanks,
Bob
 

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If they're that far out, eyeballing it wouldbe better than nothing. I have a laser bumpsteer gauge I rent out for $50 plus shipping.
 

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or you can take a look at theirs and build yourself a gauge. I already had a dial indicator but they can be picked up for cheap. just used some wood and plexi for the smooth surfaces. I remember it took a while to get it right tho so just take your time. And yeah, and eyeball will get it a little closer, but it will still probably be way off if you don't measure it.
 

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I just did this on my 85GT. I installed off-set rack bushings and a UPR bump steer kit (would buy the MM kit if I did this again) to accomodate Motorsports C springs. I eye balled it and got it close.

Then I took it to a shop (Santa Fe Garage) to get the car aligned and bumpsteer set. It cost $165 but it was worth it - the car drives perfect - much better than the results I was able to get in my garage.

Keep in mind that other adjustments, like caster, affect bump to so make sure you have toe, caster and camber where you want them before setting bump.

Also, based on their experience, the shop reported that the off set rack bushing helped get the bump steer adjusted closer zero.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks this was helpful. I'm going to get it the best I can and see if my suspension shop has the gauge when they align it.
 

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My opinion: The tie rodends doenst have to be "level" with the A-arms to have "correct" bumpsteer geometry, as long as the A-arms and the tie rods articulate in the same "C" plane as each other as the suspension goes through the range/motion, and yes you need to remove the springs and "steer" the spindles to check the geometry.
 

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I have the MM bumpsteer guage and I can tell you that you shouldnt bother buying one because making one would be very easy. I wish I had save a little cash. The most expensive part is going to be the dial indicator but you should be able to pick one up on ebay for cheap.

Also after you go through it on one side the other side goes a lot faster.
 

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Also, based on their experience, the shop reported that the off set rack bushing helped get the bump steer adjusted closer zero.
Got a question surrounding this. On a car with the stock k-member, it's generally advised to go with the center drilled rack bushings (which I have), but the other day I was looking at the relation of the tie rod with the control arm (car on the ground) and noticed it was very steep (pointing upwards to the arm). Now, by adding a bumpsteer kit, will this effectively drop down the mounting point of the outer tie rod to the spindle?

It **looked** like I should have gone with the offset version.
 

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Got a question surrounding this. On a car with the stock k-member, it's generally advised to go with the center drilled rack bushings (which I have), but the other day I was looking at the relation of the tie rod with the control arm (car on the ground) and noticed it was very steep (pointing upwards to the arm). Now, by adding a bumpsteer kit, will this effectively drop down the mounting point of the outer tie rod to the spindle?

It **looked** like I should have gone with the offset version.
Yes, a bump steer kit will lower the steering arm in relation to the spindle. My "eyeball" setting was to use about .5" of spacer between the spindle and the heim joint at the spindle. The final setting used about an 1.0" worth of spacers. This is with a stock 85 K-member and stock control arms.

When they were done my car had no toe changes in bump and minimal toe-in in droop. These measurements were made using a Hunter alignment system with software that can meaure bump at multiple steering angles. The car was cycled through bump and droop on the aiignment rack with the springs in the car.

Like they say in the commercials - your mileage may vary. In other words what worked for me may or may not work for you. I installed the off-set rack bushings because I thought they would be enough to correct bumpsteer issues. They didn't solve this issue alone but perhaps I lucked into a better setup for my car/K Member combination.
 
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