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Looking for opinions and possibe feedback on this device.

CLUTCHTAMER.COM
I have one. Very adjustable. It will help you consistently launch. I don't like that it affects the rest of your shifts tho. I don't need assistance there, just outta the hole. If I was to use it at the track a lot..... I would rig it so it disengages between the 1-2 shift.
 

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Did it improve your 60' times much. Or just make the car more consistent?
I haven't been to the track enough to give it a fair shake, only once and it was 105 degree air temp. I would predict that it would lower my sixty cause my clutch dump/engine bog/rpm recovery time is hurting more. If I was able to dial in the perfect amount of clutch slip without the bog..... 60 ft would be better
 

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If your existing clutch is up to the task, it's a really good option for an adjustable clutch. I really like mine. I have an older one and there have been design changes that I wish I had. I actually had a friend machine a new initial hit dial with extra detent balls (4) and the new ones have 2 for double the resolution. Also, the delay knob has detent balls so it doesn't move around anymore, I wish I had this.
 

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I just purchased one.did not get a chance to install it but im hoping it helps out.
 

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So do I want the under dash or in dash version?

Is this thing really picky about having the clutch cable adjusted EXACTLY the same every pass?

Is this miracle product going to let me cut 1.5 60 ft. times on drag radials with stock 28 spline axle shafts behind a t5?
 

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Is this miracle product going to let me cut 1.5 60 ft. times on drag radials with stock 28 spline axle shafts behind a t5?
If you are using the clutch pedal to shift, stock 28 spline axles /T5/radials won't have much trouble with 1.5 60's.

Here's why some have found it hard to make radials work with a manual trans...

Radials basically need to dead hook, as they will tolerate very little wheelspeed. Lets imagine launching with no clutch slip at all, engine rpm with a dead hook on the starting line would equal "0". For simplicity, lets say a car has a constant acceleration rate in 1st gear and the potential to reach it's 1/2 shift point of 7000 rpm at about 2 seconds into the run. If starting line rpm equals "0", and rpm 2.0 seconds in equals 7000 and acceleration rate is constant, at 0.5 seconds engine rpm would be 1750, at 1 second in engine rpm would equal 3500, and at 1.5 seconds 5250 with the tires dead hooked and no clutch slip at all. Obviously dead hooking alone is not the answer, as our engines don't make any power at zero rpm. You NEED some controlled clutch slipping to keep those radials dead hooked without dragging the engine down too far, as there's just no way that suspension adjustments alone can absorb enough engine rpm over a long enough time frame to make the radials work.

Here's how controlled clutch slip can help-
To a point the longer a clutch slips, the more time the car/engine has to gain speed/rpm before that clutch locks up, which in turn means engine rpm does not get dragged down as far. Lets apply the above example to a magical engine that has a completely flat torque curve of 425 ftlbs from 1500 to 5500 rpm. If that engine's clutch only slips for 0.5 second, rpm gets dragged down to 1750 after launch and that engine is only making 141.61 hp at the low point of the bog. If the clutch were to slip for a full second, rpm only dips to 3500rpm which effectively doubles it's power production to 283.23 hp thru the low point of the bog. In the real world the difference would be even more dramatic, as it's pretty unlikely the engine would be making 425 ftlbs at 1750.

When it comes time to shift, the problem for radials then becomes the fact that the rotating assembly must almost instantly shed about half of it's stored inertia energy due to the ratio change. If that excess energy is dumped into the chassis/tires all at once, there's a good chance that extra energy will be enough to knock the tires loose, resulting in less productive spin rather than propelling the car forward. The ClutchTamer makes it possible to spread that inevitable energy transfer over a longer time period, reducing it's peak to a level that doesn't knock the radials loose. Also because the car is also gaining speed during those periods of controlled clutch slip, the overall amount of energy that must be dumped due to the ratio change is also reduced.

The ClutchTamer makes it possible to choose a clutch with plenty of torque capacity, one that would otherwise grab too aggressively for a radial, then allows "dialing in" longer clutch slip as needed to raise the bog rpm without reducing that clutch's overall holding ability. There may be other ways to make a radial work with a manual trans, but my way works pretty good.

Grant
 

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Thanks for very well put explanation Grant. Seems like the same principle should work with bias slicks on marginal track. Soften the hit and get them to hook rather than spin.
 

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I have one. I like it, before I was having to baby it off the line to keep from blowing the tires off and always worried about drive line failure. It's much more consistent now.

It did take a while for me to figure out how to adjust it. I broke the knob,replaced it from with one from TSC that is sturdier.

I got the in dash version because I have a 6 point bar and didn't want anything else getting in the way of my feet getting in and out.
 
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