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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for advise about my latest Max Motorsports rear suspension plan.

My 89GT is 99% street driven during nice weather days in the summer months. I’ve owned it since 1998 and recently replaced a Global West suspension system with the following Maximum Motorsports items:


  • MM K-member with reverse offset Control Arms
  • Koni Yellows Struts with 350# C/O springs
  • MM strut tower brace and CC Plates
  • MM HD Adjustable Rear Control Arms
  • FMS Upper Control Arms
  • H&R Rear Sport Springs
  • MM Panhard Bar
  • Stock Swaybars
I sorta did the installation backwards and completed the front first. It wasn’t until I installed the PanHard Bar that seemed to make the biggest difference in stability and to my surprise the steering response.

I could drive it as is... but being a Mustang guy I can’t seem to leave well enough alone. So with the Maximum DEAL OF THE DAY sales going on again, I picked up a rear adjustable sway bar. Not sure if I really need it, but I like the idea of it acting directly on the chassis through the end links.

So now I’m trying to decide whether a Rear Coilover Kit and the Road Race Control Arms are worth the effort?

It’s the lightweight aluminum Road Race control arms that make me a little nervous about how they’ll hold up. I don’t drag race, but I can’t rule out a rare trip to the track. I don’t run slicks and only have approx. 300rwhp. I also don't plan on installing a Torque Arm in the near future. Does the Torque Arm make a difference in relieving some stress on these arms will see vs. stock uppers? I’m just looking for a little feedback. Thanks!
 

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The MM bar, coil overs, and road race arms are all very robust. I just installed them and more on my own car. Quality and engineering are first rate. If you are unsure as to whether they will work best for your intentions, why not call MM and ask the experts themselves?





 

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I have the grip box kit on my 95 Cobra and absolutely love it. The torque arm helps keep the rear end planted to the ground. I would def recommend it as a uprade for your car in the future. I recently brought the car out to Deals Gap US129 aka the dragon and it def exceeded my expectations. I was hanging with imports that I'd have never stayed with if I was running the factory or ####ty suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I ALMOST pulled the trigger on a Torque Arm yesterday, but when reading the installation instructions found out I'd have to modify yet another exhaust component... my Bassani X-Pipe. Modifying my tailpipes for the Panhard Bar sucked enough. Plus I don't weld and am not aware of a competent shop in my area yet. I won't say never to the T/A, but not this spring.

On a side note, it would be nice if Maximum Motorsports and someone in the stainless steel exhaust aftermarket (ex. Magnaflow) would collaborate to offer a quality Mustang exhaust system with extra adjustability to clear suspension mods and have minimal drone. I see a business opportunity here... cough cough.
 

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Well, I ALMOST pulled the trigger on a Torque Arm yesterday, but when reading the installation instructions found out I'd have to modify yet another exhaust component... my Bassani X-Pipe. Modifying my tailpipes for the Panhard Bar sucked enough. Plus I don't weld and am not aware of a competent shop in my area yet. I won't say never to the T/A, but not this spring.

On a side note, it would be nice if Maximum Motorsports and someone in the stainless steel exhaust aftermarket (ex. Magnaflow) would collaborate to offer a quality Mustang exhaust system with extra adjustability to clear suspension mods and have minimal drone. I see a business opportunity here... cough cough.
The other thing you might look into is a mobile fabricator. I used one to modify the rear fenders on my car he came to my house did all the work in my garage. The guy I used did allot of work with offroad racing and BFG so his truck had everything in it needed to do fab work. If there are offroad groups in your area you may want to ask around.
 

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Looking for advise about my latest Max Motorsports rear suspension plan.

My 89GT is 99% street driven during nice weather days in the summer months. I’ve owned it since 1998 and recently replaced a Global West suspension system with the following Maximum Motorsports items:


  • MM K-member with reverse offset Control Arms
  • Koni Yellows Struts with 350# C/O springs
  • MM strut tower brace and CC Plates
  • MM HD Adjustable Rear Control Arms
  • FMS Upper Control Arms
  • H&R Rear Sport Springs
  • MM Panhard Bar
  • Stock Swaybars
I sorta did the installation backwards and completed the front first. It wasn’t until I installed the PanHard Bar that seemed to make the biggest difference in stability and to my surprise the steering response.

I could drive it as is... but being a Mustang guy I can’t seem to leave well enough alone. So with the Maximum DEAL OF THE DAY sales going on again, I picked up a rear adjustable sway bar. Not sure if I really need it, but I like the idea of it acting directly on the chassis through the end links.

So now I’m trying to decide whether a Rear Coilover Kit and the Road Race Control Arms are worth the effort?

It’s the lightweight aluminum Road Race control arms that make me a little nervous about how they’ll hold up. I don’t drag race, but I can’t rule out a rare trip to the track. I don’t run slicks and only have approx. 300rwhp. I also don't plan on installing a Torque Arm in the near future. Does the Torque Arm make a difference in relieving some stress on these arms will see vs. stock uppers? I’m just looking for a little feedback. Thanks!
Why are you doing all of this stuff to a car that is 99% street driven?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That’s a good question. I don’t race, but It is still a hobby. I usually make a few improvements each year. Probably have $22k total investment, but that’s over 20 years.not bad when compared to the price of a new Mustang. You’ll laugh, but the K-member project was all due to a reoccurring oil pan gasket leak. 😉
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The car's in winter storage, so I can't get underneath to inspect or measure anything. Maybe I can persuade Maximum into sending a loaner or scrap T/A crossmember for trial fitting in the spring. This is the only half way decent picture I have of the exhaust placement and it's hard to say how much clearance is there.



Edit: Found a real old X-Pipe to stock pic.

 

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How's the ride on the street with 350# front springs?

I'm putting together a similar setup with 250# fronts and conventional springs out back on my street driven car. Was debating the T/A but hesitated for the same reasons.

I just need a few more items for the front coil overs but itching to get it installed soon. Got my rear setup going on shortly. (MM arms already installed)
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
EDIT: I just double checked my MM receipts actually have 325# springs. For some reason I was thinking 350. I recall deciding on the rate based off recommendations for Koni SA's which is 275-375 lb/in.

I used to run 800# conventional springs up front, so I wasn't worried about the 325# C/O. I think the ride is great. Definitely smoother than before and seems to corner just as flat. Plus I'm a 1/2" lower than prior and with my rim offset I think I'd rub the fender lip a lot more with softer springs. If I were able to experiment other rates it would be 350# & 300# but I don't have any regrets with my current setup.

On a side note, I picked up the softer MM front sway bar to install with the MM adjustable rear. I also got a killer deal on a Torsen T2 differential, so I'm excited to see how this stuff plays out next spring.

As for my original question in this post, I've decided to hold off on the rear C/O, race arms and T/A for a while.
 

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800# conventionals have a wheel rate of 200#. The 325# C/O has a wheel rate of 292.5#. The car should run flatter than conventionals and ride better.

As for the T/A, best mod you can make - better than the front C/Os. This is due to the rear suspension design which induces bind at the uppers. In fact, running a PHB and stock uppers creates two roll centers defined by the PHB and the uppers. Not the best handling solution when bind is added in too. Since you already have the PHB, I'd recommend trying a PM3L to see the improvement in ride quality and handling with no additional exhaust mods. You will have to increase the rear spring rate to match the fronts - probably a 350#-400# conventional spring. After that experience, you'll likely rush to the T/A mod.
 

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Since you already have the PHB, I'd recommend trying a PM3L to see the improvement in ride quality and handling with no additional exhaust mods.
Can you elaborate on what that PM3L is?

I'm like the OP, building a street car that I want to be comfortable and handle the best that it can. I do however plan to do some track days just for fun at the drag strip and also road course. It needs to be a do it all car meant for fun, not any kind of competitive racing, so I am having a hard time deciding on the suspension component parts, and threads like these definitely help to shed some light on what's most important. I still have a lot of learning to do, so I'll just keep reading along.
 

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Can you elaborate on what that PM3L is?
Poor Man's 3-Link. Removing one of the uppers. Both of them are no longer needed for lateral location when you have a panhard bar, but they will define a roll center and the panhard bar will define a much different one. That's a fight only one of them will win, at the expense of handling manners.
 

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Poor Man's 3-Link. Removing one of the uppers. Both of them are no longer needed for lateral location when you have a panhard bar, but they will define a roll center and the panhard bar will define a much different one. That's a fight only one of them will win, at the expense of handling manners.
Oh wow, that's very interesting. First I hear of this method. Thanks for the details.

It also seems that if you get the torque arm you get rid of both of the upper control arms, is that correct? If so, I'm liking that option already.
 

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Correct
 

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Poor Man's 3-Link. Removing one of the uppers. Both of them are no longer needed for lateral location when you have a panhard bar, but they will define a roll center and the panhard bar will define a much different one. That's a fight only one of them will win, at the expense of handling manners.
I've debated the PM3L as i'm not sure i want to go to the trouble of a T/A on a 100% street driven car, but i'm concerned about wear and tear from the PM3L. I know in racing applications, the bushings in the arms tend to get beaten up and fail sooner, but what about in a street driven setup. Same concerns, but to a lesser degree?

WHen i install my PHB, i may try the PM3L. I have MM lowers with the discontinued steeda upper arms that were basically stock arms, boxed, and zinc washed gold. Should i continue to use these arms, or would it make sense to try another arm?

Any long term damage to the upper arm mount on the body?

Which upper is typically removed?
 

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The torque arm, panhard bar, and coil over rear suspension is unquestionably the best mod to handling one can make to these cars. Truly, once you experience the difference (even on a street only car, unless you drive like granny) you will kick yourself for not doing it sooner. Squat under acceleration, and brake dive are both significantly reduced, grip is likewise much improved, and cornering feels way more positively connected.

Jay
 

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I know in racing applications, the bushings in the arms tend to get beaten up and fail sooner, but what about in a street driven setup. Same concerns, but to a lesser degree?
So this is a very good point. MM says for any cars over 400hp or even cars with less power that are drag raced one should run spherical bushings instead of polyurethane. I have the same concern as you in that I just don't know how a spherical bushing would work for street driving.

Do your rear lower control arms from MM have polyurethane or spherical bushings currently?
 
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