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Discussion Starter #1
This is on my civic that I run in GS. My setup is completely stock. When the car was newer the brakes would bite hard during autox. 33K miles later and they lost most of it. I have plenty of pad left and the rotors look good. I did a bunch of hard stops, kinda like if I was bedding in a new set of pads. Didn't change the feel. What other things can I try with out spending cash? Scuff the rotors?
 

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I think what you're experiencing is "glazing over" of the pads. Doesn't seem like there is a cure.

What causes brake pad glazing?
Brake pad glazing is caused when the brake pad friction material is overheated.
This results in crystallized friction material on the pad surface and the brake disc.
Typical symptoms of glazed brake pads include: Poor stopping performance, vibration or brake judder, and cracks or fissures in the brake pad material.
Pad glazing is typically caused by operating the brake pads at a temperature above the specified temperature range of the friction material or not properly following the 'Bedding-in' instructions for the brake pads. Always follow the manufacturers brake pad bedding-in instructions and use a brake pad that has a temperature range that is sufficient for its intended use.

http://www.raceshopper.com/tech.shtml
 

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The pads are probably glazed. You can knock the glaze off with sandpaper, but if they did it once, they'll do it again.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Why would you recommend changing fluid to fix a friction issue? If he complained of a soft pedal, changing the fluid would be a possible solution.
Yeah..not a soft pedal issue. During my last autox I was running in the top 10 of street tire so the brakes are working. I just needed a harder grab to get thru a few corners better.
 

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If you want to use the same rotors, you can scuff them using Garnet paper. Do NOT use silicone carbide paper. The silicone carbide will embed in the iron and will create a chemical reaction when the iron is hot. It turns the rotor into a form of iron called cementite which is extremely hard and will create just the kind of friction issues you are trying to fix.

Did you ever scuff the rotors with sandpaper?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you want to use the same rotors, you can scuff them using Garnet paper. Do NOT use silicone carbide paper. The silicone carbide will embed in the iron and will create a chemical reaction when the iron is hot. It turns the rotor into a form of iron called cementite which is extremely hard and will create just the kind of friction issues you are trying to fix.

Did you ever scuff the rotors with sandpaper?
Nope..never touched them since the car was new. Can you get Garnet paper at any hardware store?
 

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FWIW, I had installed a new booster on my 01 Explorer and for some reason the "shaft" i'll call it, wasn't adjusted correctly out of the box. The brakes worked, but the pedal wasn't being pushed back up as far as it was supposed to.....creating a drag on the brakes that you had to pull up with your foot(under the pedal).

Well, I guess I over adjusted it and it didn't have ENOUGH slack. :rolleyes: So it proceeded to begin locking up the brakes on all 4 corners. I managed to drive the car home appx 10 miles so I could work on it again. All 4 wheels were smoking and smelled like brakes.

I fixed the booster, but the pads were most certainly glazed over. You could see the material cracking and discoloration on the sides of the pads from the heat.

I took out the belt sander with the pads clamped in the bench vise and went to town. This certainly got rid of the glaze and the truck stops alot more linear now. I just need a fluid bleed and it'll be back to normal.....besides the heavily worn/thin rotors.
 

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For a street vehicle, the rotors don't typically get to the same temps as a "sporting" vehicle so the transformation to cementite will be slower. If you used regular silicone carbide paper in the belt sander, don't be surprised if you start to get some pulsing in those brakes. The rotor actually doesn't wear as much where the cementite forms and so as the rest of the rotor wears, you will have thick and thin spots creating the pulse.
 

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So far so good. This is mainly just an A-to-B vehicle so I don't mind minor inconvenience or less than stellar performance. Although I did put a set of Bilstein's on it, but that was mainly due to the girlfriend(when she uses it) thinking it was gonna roll over in a corner(she's used to driving sports car types). :rolleyes:
 
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