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Discussion Starter #1
I have Bullitt spings on my 1990. The front sits a hair higher then the rear. I figure I have 2 options: 1) find stock rear springs and cut them to bring the rear up a bit or 2) cut some off the front bullitt springs to lower the front a hair.

My question is for the front Bullitt springs... how much cut off equals how much of a drop? I don't want to have to remove the springs and reinstall them more then once if I can avoid it. Anyone cut front Bullitt springs?
 

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Cutting is not the only option. How are the spring isolators? What about using thinner isolators up front? What about using spacers in the rear?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Who sells thinner isolators or spacers? I would much rather bring up the rear a bit then lower the front. Is running without isolators a bad idea? rust problems between the springs and where they sit?
 

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Roger420 said:
Your gonna mess your springs up. Go buy a pair off ebay for cheap.
Oh come on now.

For every inch you take change the installed height of the spring, you change ride height 2 inches. If you want to drop the front an inch, take 1/2 an inch of height off the spring. This is hard to gauge, so personally I'd look at the thickness of the coils and figure how much you need to trim/grind to make it half an inch shorter. Not much. A fraction of a coil and then grinding it flat might make enough difference. So would using thinner isolators.
 

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You might try measuring the loaded coil spacing before you take them off. Measuring either from wire center to wire center or from the top of one coil to the top of the next will work. If that's 2" (as an example) and you want to lose 1/2" of spring height, you'd cut off 1/4 of a coil. This tends to be a little conservative, but having to measure/remove/cut/replace twice still beats cutting too much the first time, ending up too low and having to start the whole sequence over with another set of springs.

Norm
 

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Another option you may want to try that won't hurt anything in the sense that it is reversible is adding spring rubbers to the rear. I found some at Advanced Auto Parts. I thought I may have to use them on my car when I towed the boat but it turned out I didn't need to.

You really need to consider a lot of things before choosing a course of action.

How does the car handle now? What effects are the changes going to have?

If the car has some understeer then adding spring rubbers in the rear may help it. They will increase the spring rate and not effect the alignment. On the other hand if the car already has oversteer tendencies increasing the rear spring rate will hurt the handling. You could still try adding spring rubbers and removing the rear swaybar. Anything you do to alter the front ride height will effect the alignment so you would have to realign the car at minimum if you work on the front. You could also stand a chance of getting into the bumpsteer territory enough to need a bumpsteer kit if you don't already have one. If you are now happy with the way the car handles I think raising the rear a little and leaving the front alone would be the best avenue. You could add some shims to the tops of the rear springs and raise it some without changing the rear spring rate or needing to realign the car.

There are tons of variables so let us know what all you have done to the car and how you perceive it to handle now and we can better suggest what you should try.
 
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