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Another Vote for Blizzaks. They make the car half way decent in the snow. Took a mid winter vacation in Maine a few years back. Drove up from MD thru lots of snow. Just take it easy on the starts. Without snows, the car is a hockey puck.
Erich
 

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Doesn't suck at all since it rarely gets below 50 here
He He...Winter is something we see on a postcard from one of our relatives up "North" at X-mas.

Sorry I had to rub it in one more time.
 

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steve97Cobra said:
I don't get it. I drive my Cobra all year around, often with the top off. In the winter, sometimes I turn the heater on. ;)
One of the many reaons are am here now!
 

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I live in Chicago. Home of cold, wind, snow. <I was bored so I wrote a small novel>

To answer your question. Depends. I had a 79 Mustang as my first car and I drove it for 3 years in some of the worst snow. <Talk about an education for first time driver, I was 17 at the time. Remember the Blizzard of '79?> It did ok as long as I had about 100 lbs of weight in the rear. It was a blast to able to drive sideways all the way down the block but in a straight line. Scared my passengers to death. :evilgrin: That mustang faired better in the snow because of its small tires and narrow rims.

When I had my 96 GT Auto, I drove it 3 years through the winters. It had 17 inch rims and my top speed with snow on the ground was a whopping 20 MPH if I was lucky. Turning a simple corner was a adventure in itself. Turn the wheel to much and your going straight if you want to or not. I avoided the highways like the plague when the snow was sticking to the ground.

Now that I have my 99 GT also a Auto with traction control, 17" rims. I drove through one winter with it. After that winter in '99 I said never again in the snow. 15 MPH on side streets trying to make it home in a snow storm was final draw. I almost wrecked the car in the morning turning into the parking lot at work. Wheel turned, car went straight towards a Steel pole that seperated the driveways. :eek: Luckly the car bounced gently off the curb enough to turn me out of the way in time. Now that the car is modified I don't even dare drive it if theres even threat of rain. To much horsepower and no traction in bad conditions.

I solved the snow/rain problem with a 97 Jeep Wrangler Sahara. I bought it used, but in great condition. I actually enjoy the snowy days now. Just pull up on the handle and 4 wheel drive engages.

If your have to brave the snow. I recomend the following.

Narrow tires, 16 inch rim. Don't drive a wide tire in the snow your asking for very little traction. Slap some snow tires on those rims and you can swap out to your nice rims come spring.

Weight is your friend. Full tank of Gas and about 100lbs or more in trunk. Couple bags of rock salt work great and can get you out if you get stuck.

Drive slow, very slow, but go fast enough that you don't get stuck in the ruts in the intersection or in the deep stuff. A normal drive time of 30 minutes turned into a good 1 to 1 1/2 to get home when the snow was flying. Plan on allowing your car a couple years to stop. 17" rims make for great skis! Plan your turns carefully. To much gas and your going to be facing the direction you just came from. Turn to sharp and suddenly, your going to go straight if you want to or not.

Keep a cell Phone with you that is charged. Its great for when you need that friend, or tow truck to get you out of the ditch that you just slid into.
 

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it snows here like every couple years. it gets somewhat cold in the winter though. ive lived here since 95 and have seen two snows. no snow means they dont use any salt. cars that have been here since new have zero rust. but i grew up in cental illinois so i know how to drive on it if i have to
 

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If you do decide to drive your snake in the winter, spend the $500 and get some rims and snow tires. I went through some serious stuff this winter and did very well. I have driven rear wheel drive cars my whole life, and I would have to say that the Stang' has done the best. Not the greatest traction taking off, but the car stops great which is more important. Cannot emphazise how good it did stopping. I was really impressed, and it saved my butt a couple times. I got my car washed 3 times a week at times, but at least once religously. The only bad part about winter driving is the fact that it trashes your interior. They use a lot of sand up here and it is everywhere! Engine compartment, interior, trunk you name it. Ideally, get a winter beater, but if you love driving your car, just do it. There are very few days when the roads are covered, and just keep an eye out for the icy spots.
 

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I drove my car home from the mountains during a blizzard when it was a week old. Those gatorbacks are surprisingly good snow tires. The traction control helps too. Oh yeah, some weight in the trunk is absolutely necessary. I had to stop at a home depot and
pick up an 80 lb bag of sand so I could get home...
 

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If you have a beater, keep it; if you can't afford 2 cars and the insurance and registration, then drive the Cobra year round. I have 235/45 Pirelli Ice Asymetrical tires on all four corners on the stock rims. I place anywhere from 100 to 200 pounds of sand and small pebbles in the trunk for traction depending on the amount of snow on the roads. So far I have driven in 4-6" going up and down short steep hills in Pennsylvania and the occasional incline in Minnesota. It is very possible to do this, just keep it steady without doing anything sudden (accelerating, braking, turning.) You will have to undercoat your car and at least biweekly spray fresh water underneath to get all the salt off, otherwise you would be lucky to have the car for more than 7-8 years tops before pieces start falling off.
It is very possible to drive in the snow and ice, just prepare and do it sensibly.
 

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Mustangs won't even move in ice and snow on flat pavement.

Don't do it.
 

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I have to drive my car in the winter over here and its not too bad.... but let me tell you it's enoughf to make me want to sell it and go buy a truck next winter...

Don't do it...

Think about salt
then salt all over your underbody
then you park you car at night and the salt eats away at everything on your underbody....

If that does not scare you then be my guest .... LOL....
 

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..I'm in NJ, and this was the first winter with my '00. We really didn't have much snow..but i'll tell ya that my car drives tons better than my 92 did. the Traction control works pretty well..or...it may have been that i had my mother-in-law in the backseat providing some extra pounds on the rear axle :p
 

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not even the 1st oil change

Got my new mustang in oct 01' and this january wrecked it on ice at 30mph. Only had 4,000 mi on it and not even had it's first oil change. Indiana winters suck, you bet your ass i am getting a 4x4 for winter. If you have to drive in the snow don't plan on getting there too fast and too easily. Get yourselves some winter cars......
 

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LMAO:lol: i wish i could say she was mine, but nice avatar anyway ehh?:evil: BTW im suprised you saw the cobra in the background:eek:
 

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OK, here's the authoritative answer you were waiting for... I have been through 3 winters in my GT in Canada. I bought a set of 15" Michelin Artic Alpins on steel rims. Let me just say, these tires are amazing. My car can go through anything (except really deep snow, >12") I have no problems at all getting around, I just need to keep in mind that the car is torquey. Easy on the gas on the take off, and give yourself extra space for stopping. I use my car to get to the ski hills all winter. Tires make all the difference, even when there is no snow, there is still black ice. Probably a little more expensive for the Cobras though, 15" rims won't fit on them.
 

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Is it possible to drive a high horsepower rear wheel drive car in the snow?..........Yes but that doesn't mean its a good idea.

Driving your stang in snow/ice is not hard it just requires the utmost in concentration. All it takes is one lackadasical application of the throttle and your visual reference point will become either 90 degrees and opposite to the direction you are traveling. And it is very hard to recover.

Snow isn't that bad because unless you're an idiot you don't speed or take chances in the snow. It is ice that will get you.
I drove for four years in Eastern Washington in the snow and ice with only two mishaps. Both were on roads that were mostly dry with ice in patches. Both times I got caught giving a little too much gas when it didn't appear to be slippery. Both times the back end attempted to swap with the front. Neither of the times was I able to correct the slide (Just went along for the ride until she stopped).

Luckily neither of the times was their any significant damage to my car (the worst was a bent rim and a paint scratches from slightly sliding the rear bumper on a guard rail while traveling sideways at 25 mph)

Keep in mind I am well versed in driving in the snow and ice. These incidences were lapses in concentration on my part. The easiest way to prevent these mishaps is to minimize the time your stang sees these type of weather.

In short: KEEP THE SHO because the consequences for lapses in concentration are much more grave in a RWD car.
 
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