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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know a couple of you (MFE?) are running the GW LCA's. Since I'll be installing shocks and springs, I'm thinking of doing LCA's at the same time.

Car: 90-95% street driven, Eibach Pro-Kit, Tokico Illumina's, MM CC plates.

Intent: Looking for generally better traction and handling while maintaining good streetability and comfort. 1-2 times a year track days/drag strip, fun only, non-competitive. Possible AX later, but still not full-on competitive??? (Never investigated)

Questions:

1) How much increased noise can I expect from the GW LCA's?

2) Are these units my best option considering my intent? How about when cost is considered?

3) Are these even necessary at this point, given my intent?

All comments/recommendations welcome. Thanks.

Andy

(P.S. Thanks for all the strut/shock info. I was leaning toward the Bilsteins, but ended up with "an offer I couldn't refuse" on the Tokicos. Lots of people seemed happy with these, as well, so hopefully they'll fit the bill.)
 

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1) I heard every meshing of the gear teeth in the rear end because I had driven the car for years with all the stock bushings. One day less than a week later I realized I couldn't hear it anymore...it was "loud" because it was different, then I got used to it.

2) Perhaps not the best, but not the worst either. They made my car very much more enjoyable to drive on the street, but I don't know if they helped the autocross component very much, and I know enough now to know and feel exactly where and how they're holding me back on road courses. But I'm stuck with them while I sort out the driveline (again).

3) Necessary, no, desirable, probably, but frankly I think you'd be better off freshening the UCA's and their bushings with good fresh rubber. They'll probably make a bigger more positive difference at a lower cost at this point.
 

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Don't have em myself but looked to see how they were made.

First observation was their web site looks like a 9 y.o. did it.
Second was the sperical ends are on the frame end and bushed ends on the axle end. I never understood the logic behind this and until recently I didn't know that MM arms were made the way I thought they should be.

I have been considering these which look like the MM arms but with a better looking bushing on the chassis end.
http://hotpart.com/index.php?p=show&id=15
 

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Han Solo said:
First observation was their web site looks like a 9 y.o. did it.
Their catalog is one of the nicest that I have seen from any of our venders.

Were the FRPP lower arms made by Global West? They look similar.
 

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goduke said:
Were the FRPP lower arms made by Global West? They look similar.
Yes
 

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I am pleased with the way my car handles with the GW lower control arms. You can definately hear more road noise. It does not bother me at all.
I talked to GW about the solid bearings on the frame side versus the MMs which are the opposite. GW claims that the MM configuration is not good. I think the GWs came out first.
Erich
 

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The spherical bearing on the body side eliminates twisting forces into the torque boxes, which is one of the things that kills them. They put their solid bushing on the axle end because that's the whole point, it's an attempt to use the axle side brackets and a nearly zero-deflection bushing to limit lateral axle travel. Geometrically it doesn't matter much which end has the spherical bearing, but having it in the rear does keep the arm and therefore the spring seat from twisting under the spring in severe-lean situations. I don't know how much that matters, if at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies, guys. This is exactly what I needed. I'll look at the stock UCA bushings, and replace if deteriorated (with 10 years and 38K miles they just might be), and I'll hold off on the LCA's for now.

MFE: If/when you yank your LCA's keep me in mind. I might be interested by then.

Thanks again!

Andy

P.S. Yes, GW's website is rather lacking, but I've been told by others that their catalog is the cat's meow.
 

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Remember that the UCA's have two sets of bushings but usually when you buy a new set of UCA's you don't get the axle-side bushings. They really both should be replaced at the same time for maximum benefit.
 

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MFE said:
Remember that the UCA's have two sets of bushings but usually when you buy a new set of UCA's you don't get the axle-side bushings. They really both should be replaced at the same time for maximum benefit.
Just to add to this comment...I recently replaced the stock uppers with the M-5500-A UCA's and replaced the bushings on the axle side. The axle side bushings were trashed after 100k+ miles and lots of drag racing and autocrossing. Definitly replace them. Ford part# M-4050-B. The MM tool will save you lots of time getting the old ones out and new ones in.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks, Guys. I'll be sure to get both sets of bushings. As for the tool, it looks like a "must have" unless anyone knows a good work-around?

Andy
 

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The work-around is to use a drill to cut a hole through the bushing, then let the bit walk its way around the bushing which it will want very muc to do. The center of the bushing falls out at this point. Then you can take a hacksaw or something and cut the outer sleeve and pry/pop it out. That part is probably a pain in the ass. When I did mine, I used the MM tool, and I had still to do the drill-bit thing first becuase the bushings were so tweaked the inner and outer sleeves were no longer concentric and the tool wouldn't work. But it still took the outer sleeve out like a breeze and installed the whole new assembly just as easily.
 

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I used a ball joint press to get my upper control arm bushings out. Actually that is half true. I took the first one out using destructive techniques that included drilling thru the rubber, an air chisle (did not help much), punch and hammer to collapse the metal sleeve into the center. After that, I was like-there must be a better way. One of the cylindrical pieces fit over the back part of the ear and the adapter section pushed on the front part. Got it out intact in 15 minutes with no cursing.
Erich
 
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