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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Why is that?
We have a summit a few hours away, so as far as part sales go there’s almost nobody around here that made it. We had 2 machine shops close down in the past 3 years.
 

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So now people buying 500 hp cars off the showroom floor is considered a hobby?

SMH...
Soon it'll be KWH for the Instagram crowd. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
So now people buying 500 hp cars off the showroom floor is considered a hobby?

SMH...
No, but if they buy something new, go to car shows, maybe tinker around some then it could be.

You don’t have to heavily necessarily modify a car to have it be a hobby you enjoy. I was at a show yesterday and saw some beautiful classics, and some were pretty much never modified from stock. It’s not like the owners weren’t car guys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·

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Good local machine shops and speed shops sure are getting thin though.
Key word is "Good". There are plenty of mediocre machine shops that do barely passable work that stay plenty busy. They are the Walmart of machine shops. If it is cheap, they are busy. The quality of work on the other hand...
A excellent machine shop is hard to find. They too are busy, but it costs a lot more and takes longer to get your stuff done. They are usually just a one or two person shop, maybe three people max. They produce excellent results and their biggest complaint is the amount of time wasted on consumers, those who consume their time looking for free advice, free information, trying to get something for nothing. I understand why it is so hard to get in touch with some of them. They decided to stay busy working, not wasting time with every mouth breather who tries to call/e-mail or come through the door.
 
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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Key word is "Good". There are plenty of mediocre machine shops that do barely passable work that stay plenty busy. They are the Walmart of machine shops. If it is cheap, they are busy. The quality of work on the other hand...
A excellent machine shop is hard to find. They too are busy, but it costs a lot more and takes longer to get your stuff done. They are usually just a one or two person shop, maybe three people max. They produce excellent results and their biggest complaint is the amount of time wasted on consumers, those who consume their time looking for free advice, free information, trying to get something for nothing. I understand why it is so hard to get in touch with some of them. They decided to stay busy working, not wasting time with every mouth breather who tries to call/e-mail or come through the door.
So true, that’s why I made sure to include the “good” part. There are some dirty, unorganized machine shops around here. Some turn out acceptable work, but I wouldn’t use them for anything high end. Going with Woody was an easy decision.

That’s one reason to give them time, since the shops around here usually take 4X as much time as originally quoted. It is what it is.
 

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It seems a lot of people love to eat up the fear mongering. Start a thread in the political section if you want to discuss one topic at a time.
 

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There are plenty of mediocre machine shops that do barely passable work that stay plenty busy.
Even these junk shops are getting hard to find. Problem is, the push for everyone going to college has created such a problem with skilled labor in this country, that there's no one to replace the older guys. It's worse in machining, since everything thinks that just because they can learn G-Code and MasterCAM, they are master machinists. All the shops I've dealt with, I think the youngest person I met was in their 50's. These CNC guys, they can't replace the older generation, and have no desire to do small stuff like auto work.
 

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Damn this is sad to hear. I really wanted to get some work done by Fox Lake. When I had my 99 GT, I used to get parts from Modular Powerhouse, and then they went out of business.
 

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We have a summit a few hours away, so as far as part sales go there’s almost nobody around here that made it. We had 2 machine shops close down in the past 3 years.
Besides government regulation, factory 400 horsepower engines are also a double edged sword for machine shops. For most car enthusiasts 400 hp is enough. You also don’t need massive amounts of head or intake work with a Coyote engine.

Simply bolting on a supercharger and a tune is the max most people do with most new performance cars. That results in 500 to 600 horsepower without even calling a machine shop.

The pushrod Ford community is getting smaller because these cars aren’t being made anymore and plus the availability of higher horsepower cars out of the box is a better deal for most people.

You’ve got to be a fan of the old school to really be into the pushrod Ford scene considering you start out with 215 horsepower.
 

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Maybe the 7.3 Godzilla engine will put a spark back into the pushrod scene.
 
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I wonder if I'll be able to sell my milling machine if I needed to for some reason? Last one I sold to a gunsmith, so there's always that I suppose.

On the other hand, due to shutting down so many manufacturing facilities, I have had two milling machines, three drill presses, a lathe, large sander, kalamazoo and and 2 upright band saws, reciprocating magnetic grinding table, CNC circuit board router, large manual shear and smaller 90° cutter and hundreds of mills, drills etc, 2 full roller tool boxes and tons of bar, tube and billet aluminum and steel and copper. All for the price of I had to rent a lift-back box truck to move it all.

Doing my best to make lemonade from the lemons these traitor corporations are handing us. Then again, this all started with "Made in Japan" back in the 50's and 60's which was a result of destroying them. They decided that fighting economically was a better choice. China, Korea, Vietnam, Philippines and others have all copied this model.
 

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No posts on Facebook for like 18 months, so some might say the writing was on the wall.
 

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Does anyone have any statistical evidence on either side that would back up their claims?
Sure. Look at the growth of the Automotive Aftermarket from 1992 to 2008. SEMA has the numbers.

You will also note that the boom coincides, perfectly, with the availability of lower priced performance parts from China....which allowed an exponential growth in the number of people that could afford to participate.
 

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Why is that?
Because the business model is usually a loser....and kids want to be influencers. No shop classes, no interest in the trades. Just a confluence of events.

On the plus side, the ones that survived Obama are pretty much buried in work. (42% of my shops went under between 2009 and 2013 during the :D "recovery")
 
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