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Technically my second, first was a few weeks ago. I had a great time at my first a few weeks ago. met a guy who had a 2016 5.0, and autox'ed a fox for 17 years, so he gave me good advice. Every run I made was faster than the one before, each felt better and better.

Last weekend I did my second, and that's where the videos come from. The first video is from the outside of my car, the second is general from the event. My car appears around 42:17. The slide at the beginning really freaked me out. It's like the car was sliding, then the front gripped and turned. I've never felt a car do anything like that.

Anybody see anything in the videos they can offer any advice on? Car has MM everything up front, and fully upgraded IRS out back, and it's on 245/45/17 Firestone Indy 500's (340 tread wear.)

 

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Treat the throttle like a dimmer switch, not an on/off switch. Every change you make to the throttle moves load and traction from one end of the car to the other. Very useful once you get the feel of it, brutally slow before you do.

Look further ahead. At speed, you can't do anything about anything that's closer than about 50 feet away, but your brain will sure #### up the run trying. Look further ahead, your brain will relax and it will stop being so reactive to things it's too late to fix.

In the slaloms, pick a throttle setting and modulate it gently. Every time you hop off and on the gas, you're moving load, and traction, from one end of the car to the other, and it doesn't like it.

Don't let your hands migrate to 11 and 1, all you're doing then is using your muscles to swing your arms around together instead of finessing the wheel.

The slides are happening because you're jumping on the gas too suddenly in the turn, and then when the slide gets going, you don't feel it coming soon enough, so instead of easing off the gas a little bit, and earlier, you snap off the gas late, weight shifts to the front, lightening the rear, and the slide gets worse, until it stops suddenly and you're all crossed up on the wheel and behind the action of the car. Modulate the gas. Anticipate the slide, and also when the rear will regain traction. Plan for that, and plan to get the wheel back in a hurry. CPR. Correct, Pause (while the suspension prepares to unload its energy back the other way), Recover (quickly).

Focus on being smooth and placing the car close to the handful of critical cones on the course, and speed will come in spades. The guy in the strawberry notch? Smoooth. Probably pretty fast.

And again, because it always works and it bears repeating...look further ahead of the car. You should be looking to the next course element before you're out of the one you're in.
 

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Agree with MFE. Better hand position will reduce the torque used to turn the wheel. That will allow more finesse. You can practice hand position, the throttle and brake "dimmer" switch, and looking ahead on the street.

For hand position, start at 9 and 3; as you move into a turn shuffle your hands (not hand over hand) so they stay more or less in the starting positions. Try to avoid crossing over center. If you notice an few times your arms formed a cross as you tried to gain control. This promotes very slow reaction and overcompensation - keep your hands where you can finesse the wheel.

For throttle and brake pretend you are driving a limo and your passengers are partying - not strapped in; they don't want to be tossed around. This will get you in the habit of squeezing the throttle and brake. Practice the limo stop where you hall the car down fast but smoothly with no rock at the end - again, passengers in the rear having a party. Same with acceleration - smooth is fast. Then you start putting these together in turns and transitions.

Look at the course as series of sweepers and transitions. Right now, I wouldn't advise changing anything more on your car until you can drive it at the limit. This includes tires. Good sticky tires tend to mask poor driving habits. The ones you have need you to control the car better which will pay huge dividends once you learn that control and move to the 200TW or R-comps
 
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