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Discussion Starter #1
The balljoints on my car were, I believe, factory original to a fox-body, and were "lubed for life". I installed them 3 years ago as part of a used assembly with A-arms containing Delrin bushings and SN95 spindles and hubs. At the same time I installed Global West 800-lb front springs and Koni DA's. I was never quite happy with the ride height, it seemd a tad too high for me.

The other day I noticed the car's steering failing to return to center on occasion. As I'd recently installed a MM bumpsteer kit and had MM c/c plates I figured it was time for new balljoints. So I ordered up a set of Steeda X2's knowing that by installing them I could either lower the fron 1/2 an inch with no roll center penalty, or keep the same height and improve the roll center if I installed the included spacers.

I decided to install them without the spacers and take the drop.

Other than the fact that I learned immediately after installing them that I could have saved a boatload of money on them (see this thread http://www.corral.net/forums/showthread.php?t=704278 ), I am totally pleased with the results.

The improvement in ride quality is simply amazing. Ride harshness I had always blamed on the Koni's was clearly friction in the balljoints the entire time. It soaks up even small impacts much better than before.

Handling-wise, I can't quantify it yet, but the front end digs in so much harder that I now have to be on the watch for oversteer more than ever before.

The car is much more enjoyable to drive, and I fully expect I'll pick up some time on autocross and road course that I'd previously been leaving on the table.
 

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Something that I noticed when I installed X2s on my fox was that I lost caster range at the same height (I have coil-overs). I lost about 1.5 degrees.
 

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I've been pretty pleased with my x2's as well but mine were anything BUT low friction. You can't hardley move them by hand and when you do they make an audible scruffing noise. Completely installed I see no problems or noise.
 

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OK, silly question... What kind of balljoint do the Griggs WC arms use? Is it a "stock" Mustang ball joint, and if so, would I benefit from going to the extended balljoints like the Ford part in the link MFE posted?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The drop in CG without a drop in RC is exactly what I expected the improvements to come from, but what I discovered this morning (after dialing my camber and toe in better last night) is that my increased turn-in "bite" is actually a pretty massive case of bumpsteer. :mad:

I knew this was a potential issue and it just so happens that I had about 1/2 an inch of extension left in my MM bumpsteer kit, so I used it when I installed the joints. I don't think it was enough, because as it leans into fast sweepers it gets twitchy and non-linear, which is the outside tire toe-ing in on compression, aka bumpsteer.

I'm going to see how many spacers I can add to the bump kit in an effort to mitigate it.
 

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MFE said:
The drop in CG without a drop in RC is exactly what I expected the improvements to come from, but what I discovered this morning (after dialing my camber and toe in better last night) is that my increased turn-in "bite" is actually a pretty massive case of bumpsteer. :mad:

I knew this was a potential issue and it just so happens that I had about 1/2 an inch of extension left in my MM bumpsteer kit, so I used it when I installed the joints. I don't think it was enough, because as it leans into fast sweepers it gets twitchy and non-linear, which is the outside tire toe-ing in on compression, aka bumpsteer.

I'm going to see how many spacers I can add to the bump kit in an effort to mitigate it.
On my upr bumpsteer kit I had to extend it down as far as I could and still get bite on the nyloc portion of the locknut with the X-2's installed. A $8 angle finder from Home Depot is a great tool for finding the base setting. The bottom of the outer portion of the lower a frame is very close to the pivot angle so I stuck the magnetic side of the angle finder on that and read the angle. I then stuck it on the tie rod and set it to the same angle as the a frame. Haven't actually measured bump steer but I don't sense any while driving either street or auto-x.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Maybe I should amend my post to "damn what a difference 0.330 inches makes" on the bumpsteer. I re-purposed the balljoint spacers I no longer needed and added them to the spacer stack on the bumpsteer kit. Like yours, it's almost too long for the shank, but it virtually eliminated the bumpsteer. The car drives like it's half its age now.
 
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