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Discussion Starter #1
I feel like such an idiot even posting this, but I couldn't find anything under the SEARCH except for UPGRADING brakes/pads.

How the hell do you change the rear brake pads?! I know you hafta turn/screw the piston into the caliper, but Jesus Christ, how many turns do you hafta go on that bastard!?

My OE pads have about a width of a nickel of pad left on them. Figured I'd do a quick swap with some 20$ "wear-ever" pads from Advance Auto(they are freakin THICK ASS PADS!!) I used a pair of vise-grips to turn the piston a 1/2 turn each time. I musta spend 20minutes turning that thing(clockwise, like I was tightening it)and I could barely fit the new pads in the caliper.......no room at all for the rotor!

Needless to say I'm pissed because I'm frustrated, but hopefully someone will gimme a link, a tip a trick or something. I've changed brake pads on pretty much all my cars before and had no problem with the rears on any of them. Geeez, that is pissing me the F-off. :blam: :crying: :curses:
 

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buy that little cheap square block looking tool and use a ratchet. If you want, I'll bring the one I have and you can change your pads this Sunday. I think it turns in till it is flush
 

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Discussion Starter #3
tnturbo said:
buy that little cheap square block looking tool and use a ratchet. If you want, I'll bring the one I have and you can change your pads this Sunday. I think it turns in till it is flush
If you would, just let me see what it looks like so I can go pick one up and keep in the tool box.

SO that thing does go "flush"? Mine still has about a THUMB's width left!!!
 

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I'm pretty sure you need to push and turn at the same time, and sometimes you have to push pretty hard. The piston retracting tool from the parts store might be a worthwhile investment. I'd spend the minimum on a cheap one unless you plan on doing more work like that in the future. The tool captures a couple slots in the piston and you twist the threaded shaft with a racthet or wrench and it turns the piston while applying pressure.

I honestly have not done a rear Mustang caliper, but have done many other rear pad swaps and sometimes use a similar tool.

Here's another thought... Do you still have the stock rear brakes, or might you have upgraded to Cobra or Mach 1 parts? There are 2 different pads for the rear, one being thicker, for use w/ the GT caliper and thinner rotors.

Good luck-
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for chiming in.......

I have the OE brake pads, and the OE GT rear caliper/rotor. I saw the two "slots" in the piston, and couldn't use a screw driver to turn it, so I resorted to the channel-locks.

I'll see what TnTurbo(Jeff) looks like and pick up one like it, or similiar. Geez, I love how the simplest crap can be complicated. :mad:
 

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That looks a lot simpler that the high end tool we have here, which may be a good thing. My gut reaction is that will work great. I'd keep the caliper bolted onto the car w/o the rotor in place and use an extension on the socket so you can get a firm position to push while you turn.

Maybe others w/ direct experience w/ that tool have some good ideas on how to best hold things while you work on it.
 

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That's it. Any old parts store has one. That tool sucks btw, but does work. I had to file a little bit on one of the nubs to make mine fit right.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
40 bucks........YIKES! I'll stick with the crappy block lookin' thing for 10 bucks
 

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I have the little $10 block tool. I am happy with it. I have used it 20-30 times. Yeah it jumps/slips sometimes, but it works well.
 

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You never know how good a tool is til you use it a time or two. This one works pretty good too. Saves a lot of time. It works much better than the 2 C-clamps I had to use on the front calibers.

Check your closest Harbor Freight. I got a sales paper in the mail a few days ago and it's on sale for $29.
 

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I had to take a bastard file and file down the "nubs" so they would fit better. I ended up pushing and turning for so long that the palm of my hand got raw, so make sure you have some gloves. It also helps to take off the rotor and then remount the caliper. Put a c-clamp over the caliper saddle where the caliper rails are to keep it from pushing out the back.

One problem with the cube I got is that the metal is soft and therefore the nubs start to wear down. If I were going to do alot of open track events and change brake-pads at the track for a higher temp pad I would buy a better tool.
 

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Here is a link to the tool we use: Brake Caliper Tool

This tool is made by SP Tools/Schley Products, this happens to be the version MAC Tools sells, Snap-On, Matco & Cornwell all sell the same product. I think retail is around $100. It's designed for a shop that works on a lot of different cars, so it's not the best solution for what's being talked about here in terms of cost, but once you use it, you'll understand the difference. It's a solid design, made with hardened steel adapters and pins, and works like a champ.

Just showing what else is out there, and I know the guys who make them, they run our brakes on their Viper race car. Good people, good products.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
well, hoping to only change rear pads about 3 or 4 times in this cars life. My OE pads lasted 32,000 miles so if the 10$ part lasts 2 or 3 brake pad changes......i'm good to go.
 
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