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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

What bump steer kits are you guys using? The Steeda and UPR look pretty good with enough adjustment. Anyone suggest anything? Any pros/cons to any of the kits?
 

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MM front and rear. Be sure to buy MMs bumpsteer gauge, its easy to do and youll get the full benefits of the bumpsteer kit.
 

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What makes you think you need a bumpsteer kit? Don't mean to be confrontational, but I've seen quite a few people buy them for no other reason than they're there to buy. With that said, I'd go straight for an MM kit and ignore the Steeda and UPR knockoff junk.
 

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If you do require it, I recommend the mm unit since no machining is required. I purchased the griggs unit and I had to have the spindle machined out for the bolt.
 

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I have the UPR. It bolted right on with no mods. One of the ends did get a little play in it after 20,000 miles but I live on a dirt road. Also the replacement end from UPR is only $10. Have been very happy with their stuff. Purchased BS kit and a shifter for 100 bucks each.
 

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They are used to get the correct tie rod angle by installing the shimmy/spacers. I use steeda and had no trouble. I also have to offset rack - n - pinion bushings installed to help get the correct angle. You have to do it on flat ground while the cars weight is on the springs (ie alignment rack). Remember steeda work directley with ford for R&D. The products they have work great. If you have it installed correctley the car will track better around the corners with bumps. This will help you hold your line in the corner. Less steering wheel jerking knocking you off line.
 

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fast1992lx said:
I'd go straight for an MM kit and ignore the Steeda and UPR knockoff junk.

WHY?? My Steeda kit is everybit as good as the MM kit with the tapered stud. I was able to adjust out most of my Bumpsteer with the steeda kit, but those taperstud kits all have their limitations.


Sorry, I just get sick of hearing " Maximum Motorsports and Griggs!! Nothing else is worth your time!!"

While I agree they make good product, they aren't the only suitable components on the market. I have mostly MM parts on my car, but I don't feel my Steeda parts are a compromise.

To answer the question, if your car isn't lowered too much, the Steeda kit will work great and it's a snap to install. You can make your own bumpsteer guage out of plywood and two cheap hinges from a hardware store. Do a Google or look in the Mathis Mustang Suspension book.
 

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92MNstanger said:
Sorry, I just get sick of hearing " Maximum Motorsports and Griggs!! Nothing else is worth your time!!"
Its maybe the fact that Steeda has some bad business practices and other people's products some how end up being copied and then having a Steeda decal slapped on it. Thats what has made me go to MM, they have great tech help, incredibly detailed instructions and an overall better package of parts. That are matched to work together.
I agree some of the Steeda parts are very good. I like the tri-ax, had one on my T45, sold it and bought one for my T56. They sem to have alot of bling associated with their parts while MM and Griggs are used/tested and proven to perform on the race cars that Ive seen on track around here. I dont see that much steeda stuff on track, its usually on the street cars sitting in the parking lot watching us race.
 

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Well, I have a Triaxe shifter and one of their front stabars, so I don't think all of their products are junk. I've held bumpsteer kits from UPR, Steeda, and settled on an MM kit because the MM kit was more complete and had a greater and finer range of adjustability. The heim joints also appeared to be better quality. When it comes to heim joints, you get what you paid for. You can't buy a cheapie kit and expect the heim joints to be decent quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Okay, we seem to be getting a little off topic...with that said...why do I need a bumpsteer kit? Well, that question would seem to have a fairly obvious answer in the fact that there is no easy way to get rid of bump and droop steer with one.

As far as kits go, it seems from what you guys have said the Steeda and MM are both good. So with either kit, did anyone have unusal trouble with installation or aligning the car (assuming everyone knows how to align a car properly)?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Okay, we seem to be getting a little off topic...with that said...why do I need a bumpsteer kit? Well, that question would seem to have a fairly obvious answer in the fact that there is no easy way to get rid of bump and droop steer without one.

As far as kits go, it seems from what you guys have said the Steeda and MM are both good. So with either kit, did anyone have unusal trouble with installation or aligning the car (assuming everyone knows how to align a car properly)?
 

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If you have a k-member with relocated control arm pivots, you really need a bumpsteer kit or you'll have a very darty unpredictable car. If you significantly increase the caster your car has, you should probably get a bumpsteer kit. If you install SN95 spindles on a Fox Mustang, you should probably get a bumpsteer kit. If you purchase a bumpsteer kit and don't bumpsteer your car, you've pretty much wasted your money.

The tapered stud kits work fine on cars with stock k-members. If your car has the control arm pickup points raised 1" or more, you need to get the bolt through bumpsteer kit that requires drilling out the steering arm on the spindle. The tapered stud style won't have enough upward adjustment range.
 

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All you guys spouting off about the "inferior" bumpsteer kits...what are you basing it on? You say the MM kit has a finer range of adjustment, how do you figure that? Think about what a bump steer kit is for a minute and then justify how you can say the MM kit is VASTLY superior to the Steeda kit or the UPR kit. We're not tlaking about K-members or caster camber plates here.
 

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Since UPR and Steeda are both located down here, they have displays at all the Ford related shows/races in the area. What makes the MM kit better, at least with the bolt through kit, is that they provide 2 different length bolts depending on the shim stack you need, and quite a few more shims of thicker and thinner size to get the bumpsteer closer to an ideal setting. The other kits I've seen only came with one length bolt, and the shims were fewer and did not offer as much of an adjustment range than the MM kit. I am not an expert concerning heim joints, but I would wager the heim joints in the MM kit are pretty high quality, whereas the UPR joints are probably whatever they can get to turn the maximum profit. Know anyone running a UPR bumpsteer kit in AI? The Steeda kit I've only handled once, and it appeared to be nice, but it still didn't offer the adjustment range of the MM kit. Perhaps their heim joints are good quality, but I'll just go with the MM kit and be done with it. With a cheap kit, maybe you can adjust the bumpsteer to where it's acceptable, but with a more comprehensive kit you can adjust it more precisely, and the cheap heim joints are going to crap out on you more quickly, especially on the street.

If you really want to do it the right way, find a chassis shop that can do the bumpsteer check for you and build a bumpsteer kit using one piece tubing for a spacer instead of multiple stack spacers. They'd probably get the bumpsteer setting near perfect.
 

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Jack Hidley said:
If you have a k-member with relocated control arm pivots, you really need a bumpsteer kit or you'll have a very darty unpredictable car. If you significantly increase the caster your car has, you should probably get a bumpsteer kit. If you install SN95 spindles on a Fox Mustang, you should probably get a bumpsteer kit. If you purchase a bumpsteer kit and don't bumpsteer your car, you've pretty much wasted your money.

The tapered stud kits work fine on cars with stock k-members. If your car has the control arm pickup points raised 1" or more, you need to get the bolt through bumpsteer kit that requires drilling out the steering arm on the spindle. The tapered stud style won't have enough upward adjustment range.
I installed a set of MM 3/4" offset fox length arms on my 87 lx. I still have the C/C plates maxed on caster, and am currently still using fox spindles.

It turns out one of my tierods is very difficult to adjust, so I probably need at least the inner tierod and tierod end on that side.

But, I will be getting 96+ spindles sometime soon, and eventualy a kmember.

Is bumpsteere going to be a real big problem with the fox spindles and max caster? I don't want to have to keep buying multiple suporting pieces as I upgrade the car, or drilling the fox spindles and then replacing them and drilling the new spindles as well.

Just looking for suggestions as to what course to take as I upgrade the car - ie. when is a bumpsteere kit a neccesity. I supose for now, I could dial out some caster, and replace the inner/outer tie rod. but how much caster is too much is too much?
 

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Bumpsteer with the Fox spindles and max caster won't be bad as long as you keep a stock K-member. Just don't install the 96 spindles until you do the K-member. Then you must use a bolt through bumpsteer kit and drill out the steering knuckles on the spindle for it.
 

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thanks Jack.

Any estimate of just how much caster I have now, with the 3/4" offset arms and the plates fully maxed?
 

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A bumpsteer kit allows you to adjust the vertical position of the outer tie rod. The purpose of this is to put the tie rod in the position where the front suspension has minimum bumpsteer (toe change with vertical suspension movement). The only way to know where the tie rod needs to be placed is to measure the bumpsteer curve of your front suspension with the tie rod in different vertical positions. This takes a few hours and requires some tools to do.

Therefore, if you buy a bumpsteer kit and don't bumpsteer your front suspension, you've wasted your money because you are getting no benefit from the kit. It's just like buying a pair of pants and not wearing them. What's the benefit?
 

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I respectfully disagree that there is no benefit to installing one and at least eyeballing it. Some improvement is better than no improvement even though much more can be gained by doing it right.
 
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