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1991 Ford Mustang LX
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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry, I know this question is beaten to death. The problem is I read forums upon forums and people start talking about 9 different solutions with 9 different parts with all sorts of possible outcomes. I just have a generic brake system question.

I have a SN95 brake booster and an SN95 MC on a 1991fox. I have wilwood disc in the back and wilwood disc in the front. I have three questions

1. Which ports on the MC are the front and rear?
2. Any chance anyone knows the tapping sizes? Instructions only has bench bleeding tips.
3. Can I use an adjustable proportioning valve for the rear and just tee the fronts off directly from the MC?
 

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Rear port (firewall side) is the front brakes, front port is for rear brakes.
Yes, the proportioning valve can be installed inline to the rear brakes.
The fittings are double flare and can be metric or standard. It depends on the M/C.
 

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1991 Ford Mustang LX
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Discussion Starter #3
Rear port (firewall side) is the front brakes, front port is for rear brakes.
Yes, the proportioning valve can be installed inline to the rear brakes.
The fittings are double flare and can be metric or standard. It depends on the M/C.
Thanks man just made my life 1000% easier
 

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The fittings are double flare and can be metric or standard. It depends on the M/C.
Right. Need more specifics than "SN95 MC".
 

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1991 Ford Mustang LX
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Discussion Starter #5
MC from a 1995 gt v8 mustang
MFG duralast
part number: NM2198
 

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1991 Ford Mustang LX
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Discussion Starter #6
Question if anyone knows.

do metric and NPT brake fittings both have the option to use a bubble flare or double flare?
Or does metric use one and NPT use the other?
 

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Not sure why you want a manual prop valve, but if the plan is to balance your F/R brake torque, the prop valve is not designed for that. The prop valve is designed to adjust the pressure slope "knee-point" where pressure is reduced to prevent rear lock before front lock during emergency braking events.
 
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