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$129.97 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=122_124_233&products_id=580

$349.95 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=21_90&products_id=480

$449.00 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=21_89&products_id=225


Total - $928.92 plus tax and shipping

You'll get a better bang for your buck by properly locating and controlling your rear axle than you will by (barely) lowering your car and new struts with the kit you posted. Traction and braking should be improved as well, which won't happen with lowering springs.
 

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$129.97 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=122_124_233&products_id=580

$349.95 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=21_90&products_id=480

$449.00 - http://www.maximummotorsports.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=21_89&products_id=225


Total - $928.92 plus tax and shipping

You'll get a better bang for your buck by properly locating and controlling your rear axle than you will by (barely) lowering your car and new struts with the kit you posted. Traction and braking should be improved as well, which won't happen with lowering springs.
Without a doubt. Just save up for springs/shocks next. And then a K-member. And front/rear control arms.
 

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Yeah, except with just the rear end stuff, you have an understeering pig, until you spend more money to address the front camber issues. I'd probably go more in the SFC/cc plates/good struts and shocks (rebuildable, for future changes) direction, personally. But, I completely agree the quadra bind rear is a huge problem and fixing it is a basic "building block" and money well spent.

I guess the question that needs to be asked is whether the $1000 is a starting point or is it the total amount to be spent? Also, it always makes sense to take care of maintenence or wear item stuff, before spending any fun money.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
that 1000 is pretty much all i want to put into handling


thats why i was thinking shocks struts springs sway bars and some stiffining
 

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I had an '02 GT that I ran in Shelby club events that had similar springs/dampers as the Bullitt kit (MRT's version), but also full length SFC's, CC plates with an aggressive alignment, 13" PBR brakes/spindle ducts up front and a set of 17X9" rims with 275 DOT R's and it was pretty fun...and also had no problem keeping up with lots of "faster" set ups. Of course, when the rear end got to maxi bind and went "pop", it was kind of interesting...:eeek:

Anyhow, if $1000 is the total, doing the Bullitt kit plus SFC's and CC plates is pretty reasonable, I'd say.
 

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I had an '02 GT that I ran in Shelby club events that had similar springs/dampers as the Bullitt kit (MRT's version), but also full length SFC's, CC plates with an aggressive alignment, 13" PBR brakes/spindle ducts up front and a set of 17X9" rims with 275 DOT R's and it was pretty fun...and also had no problem keeping up with lots of "faster" set ups. Of course, when the rear end got to maxi bind and went "pop", it was kind of interesting...:eeek:

Anyhow, if $1000 is the total, doing the Bullitt kit plus SFC's and CC plates is pretty reasonable, I'd say.
so that bullitt kit will work on a 93 gt foxbody just the sway bars wont work right
 

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I didn't notice that you had a Fox. You can get the same type of Bullitt spring/Tokico package without the bars for around $400, in that case. But, if you can swing it, for another $300 or so, you can get a package with better dampers, like Bilstein or Koni...well worth it.
 

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I didn't notice that you had a Fox. You can get the same type of Bullitt spring/Tokico package without the bars for around $400, in that case. But, if you can swing it, for another $300 or so, you can get a package with better dampers, like Bilstein or Koni...well worth it.

would sway bars help or not worth the money
 

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would sway bars help or not worth the money
They might, or they might not. Like springs, sway bars (anti-roll bars,) are used to tone a car's setup. The ideal bar for the car depends on the track, the driver, and the car itself. Tough to say whether you need a stiffer or more flexible bar, or of the factory bars will work well until after trying the car on a track.

My '88 works pretty well using the factory sway bars and MUCH stiffer springs.
 

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For $1000? All stock now? Oh boy.

First, I'd never recommend a TA or even a PHB as starting points. The major issues are controlling the body and camber curve.

I'm going to go a whole different way... that's to recommend struts/shocks and some good springs and swaybars (primarily the front bar) to keep the car planted and cut the roll lessening the loss of camber causes by the horrible suspension geometry. TA's and SFC's and all that, they don't give you more contact patch.

When you drive the car I'm pretty sure the major complaints are that it wallows around, it doesn't track well, it takes bumps horribly and hops and skips around, etc. Right?

I'll finish by saying you can't make the car handle anywhere near as well as you could on $1000, that's barely a dent and things like SFC's would be great to have, but a good set of shocks alone will be $500+ (and that's not a great set of shocks).

If you don't understand suspension, then $1000 seems like a lot--but folks spend that and much more on parts that make less real world difference. Headers, rear ends. Hell a good set of tires will cost $1k and wear out in 15k miles.....
 

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For $1000? All stock now? Oh boy.

First, I'd never recommend a TA or even a PHB as starting points. The major issues are controlling the body and camber curve.

I'm going to go a whole different way... that's to recommend struts/shocks and some good springs and swaybars (primarily the front bar) to keep the car planted and cut the roll lessening the loss of camber causes by the horrible suspension geometry. TA's and SFC's and all that, they don't give you more contact patch.

When you drive the car I'm pretty sure the major complaints are that it wallows around, it doesn't track well, it takes bumps horribly and hops and skips around, etc. Right?

I'll finish by saying you can't make the car handle anywhere near as well as you could on $1000, that's barely a dent and things like SFC's would be great to have, but a good set of shocks alone will be $500+ (and that's not a great set of shocks).

If you don't understand suspension, then $1000 seems like a lot--but folks spend that and much more on parts that make less real world difference. Headers, rear ends. Hell a good set of tires will cost $1k and wear out in 15k miles.....
Great post.

Koni Yellows, FMS springs a friend gave me because he thought they were too stiff (I tried to tell him his problem was the KYBs not controlling the wheels!) and CC plates went a long way on my car when I was a broke college student.

If I had a $2000 total budget, I'd do no power mods and add the rear suspension though.
 

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When I first modified the suspension on my car back in 1995, I did exactly what you guys are recommending. I put in Koni shocks and struts (even Koni quad shocks!) and put in some lowering springs that dropped the car about 1.75". For five years I had a car that felt like it handled pretty well, but rode like a tractor and scraped every molehill I drove over. Every girl I dated HATED going anywhere in my car without wearing a sports bra (not that I minded! :king:).

While I was installing my torque arm and panhard bar, I made the decision to reinstall the factory springs. My car handled better with the TA/PHB combo and factory springs than it did scraping the ground everywhere, and was far more comfortable. Of course, like most of us, I have eventually decided to install a coilover set up.

A big part of my recommendation for the OP to use his limited funds for a TA/PHB was to avoid having to buy the same parts twice. The TA/PHB will set up a foundation for future modifications and won't need to be redone at a later date, and they shouldn't wear out.
 

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When I first modified the suspension on my car back in 1995, I did exactly what you guys are recommending. I put in Koni shocks and struts (even Koni quad shocks!) and put in some lowering springs that dropped the car about 1.75".
Which Koni's? Of they were the reds, the spring you needed to run to keep the car off the bumpstops after droping it 1.75" was likely too stiff for the dampers, therefore your ride quality went out the window -- OR -- your springs weren't stiff enough and you were hitting the bumpstops all the time.

Also, lowering the car 1.75" is WAY too much for the stock suspension geometry. You've put the front end well into bump travel territory. You're going to loose what little dynamic camber gain the front end had and instead, you'll have dynamic camber LOSS, which never did anyone any good.


For five years I had a car that felt like it handled pretty well,
I will bet that if you'd measured the handling, you would have found that it was worse than if you had left it stock. What feels fast ain't necessarily so.

While I was installing my torque arm and panhard bar, I made the decision to reinstall the factory springs. My car handled better with the TA/PHB combo and factory springs than it did scraping the ground everywhere, and was far more comfortable.
I'm not surprised!

A big part of my recommendation for the OP to use his limited funds for a TA/PHB was to avoid having to buy the same parts twice.
The TA/PHB combo is a good approach, but increasing the grip in the back without addressing the grip in the front just leaves you with a car that plows terribly. On the street you may not care, but on an autocross course or on the track, where it matters, you'll hate fighting a car with a lot more rear grip compared to the front.

Springs and dampers are the foundation of the suspension and if chosen wisely, should work for a long, long time. If the owner does eventually cheeose to go with a rear TA./PHB setup, all he needs to do is replace the rear springs with stiffer ones. That'll cost all of MAYBE $100 -- maybe cheer depending on where you shop. My rear springs cost me under $60.
 

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When I first modified the suspension on my car back in 1995, I did exactly what you guys are recommending. I put in Koni shocks and struts (even Koni quad shocks!) and put in some lowering springs that dropped the car about 1.75". For five years I had a car that felt like it handled pretty well, but rode like a tractor and scraped every molehill I drove over. Every girl I dated HATED going anywhere in my car without wearing a sports bra (not that I minded! :king:).

While I was installing my torque arm and panhard bar, I made the decision to reinstall the factory springs. My car handled better with the TA/PHB combo and factory springs than it did scraping the ground everywhere, and was far more comfortable. Of course, like most of us, I have eventually decided to install a coilover set up.

A big part of my recommendation for the OP to use his limited funds for a TA/PHB was to avoid having to buy the same parts twice. The TA/PHB will set up a foundation for future modifications and won't need to be redone at a later date, and they shouldn't wear out.
Highlighted the part that, I think, tells the story on a budget suspension upgrade. Once you get past around 3/4" lower on the front end, you're into the wonky part of the camber curve and bump steer equation.

I agreed with the Bullitt type kit simply because the budget given wasn't going to allow both good dampers and springs...might as well get dampers matched to the spring rate and springs that give a workable ride height.

But, if it was me, I'd spend a couple/few hundred more, get good damper and a set of springs with a higher rate than the Bullitts, with minimum lowering...along with CC plates. I also agree with Sam on the front bar.

The SFC's might seem non mission critical, but I've just seen enough tired Fox unibodies that I wouldn't start adding wheel rate or grip without tying the sub frames to allow the parts to work as intended.
 

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Make certain all of the wear items are checked and corrected as needed; good tires and brakes and then spend some money on driving schools. The car in stock trim more than likely can handle much better than a novice can drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When you drive the car I'm pretty sure the major complaints are that it wallows around, it doesn't track well, it takes bumps horribly and hops and skips around, etc. Right?

it deffinitly hops and skips around for sure it dosent have too much understeer from what i can tell and i cant really give any throttle in the turn or my back end will whip out quick. i mean quick!


im just a sixteen year old kid tryin to get allitle more out of my stang im not expecting it to be a porshe or beamer but to handle as good as say like a mach 1 or bullit mustang maby a 03 cobra

i might get this to the track like twice a year im not gunna be racing this to often

that thousand i want to spend is like all i want to spend on handling
 

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Spend $940 on the recommended parts and $60 on a www.streetsurvival.org clinic or autocross school. The single biggest, cheapest improvement you can make to your car's handling is the proverbial "nut behind the wheel".
 

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The single biggest, cheapest improvement you can make to your car's handling is the proverbial "nut behind the wheel".
100% agree.

Fix what's broken/worn out first. Then get some good springs/dampers on the car (personally, I like Koni Sports or Bilsteins -- talk to Sam Strano about specific spring rates, dampers and how much to safely lower the car.)

Lastly, upgrade the nut behind the wheel. In fact, I'm tempted to say leave the springs and dampers alone and spend that money on the driver too.
 
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