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Battery and box out; driver's side tail light out; lighting wiring harness out; hold down for jack out; trunk latch out; to get both pieces of mdf out. Trimmed the mdf so it can go back in with all this other stuff in place.



All that to get to this part of the trunk. The mdf was placed over those fuel pump relay wires. And those two little bolts have to come out -- the reinforcement plate and fasteners will cover up that area. Had to trim the mdf to make room around that too.
 

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When you're a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

The two bolts and the fuel pump wires (mashed under the mdf) came right out. I'll reroute the wires. The grommeted wire-hole is within a whisker of being in the right place for one of the chassis bracket bolts. Might be able to just enlarge it a bit. The reinforcement plate/fasteners for the chassis Panhard bracket will go in this corner.



Cleaned up the floor, put in the light, harness and trunk latch. Trimmed mdf for the passenger's side fell right into place. You can see the original brown paint under the jack hold-down bracket.


 

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It’s fun (not) discovering changes made in the history of a vehicle.
Kind of like doing a remodel on an older house, you never know what you’ll find.

Pulled driverside headlight on truck. Retrofitted HID and projector setup. Bad ground. Not sure if on plug end or chassis end but I think I’ve got it fixed now. We shall see.

Short list of stuff that got fixed on last camping trip:
-water heater board went out. $100
-new tires ordered $560
-top slide seal on big slide tore. TBD on price, probably 75ish
-repaired drawer that fell apart at dovetails (gotta love camper quality)

Buddy’s list at same campground/time
- water leak on ice maker line/hardware store run for Birdseye fittings
-outside storage hatch key lock froze up. Replaced all five at $12 each. plus hammering out old that were badly corroded

buddy’s dad there at same time
-brand new golf cart ate a wheel bearing. $75 later the on site shop discovered the spindle was bent from factory. Went two days without cart but got new spindle under warranty from manufacturer.

Better be handy and have some $ with any camper. Pay to play.
 

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...

Better be handy and have some $ with any camper. Pay to play.
It is a small house on wheels, with lots of parts by various makers and installers.
 

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It is a small house on wheels, with lots of parts by various makers and installers.
More like a small shack lol. Not only does it run off standard AC power, most of the control systems actually run off DC power. Full automotive style fusebox with mini fuses, plus mobile home style breakers

Frames with 2x2’s on 24” centers. Not a typo.

Mix in automotive stuff like chassis, leaf springs etc.

They make cheap mobile home construction look like the taj majal.
 

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I'm sorry, that does sound like less than a mobile home. I've seen a couple of mobile homes get scrapped over months of time. A resident in the park that I delivered to did scrap metal for a living. Two homes were abandoned, and the park owner let him scrap them. They are made cheap enough a big man would be able to run through any wall if he was dumb enough to do it. The only part of the mobile homes that was sturdy was the frame. After the debris was hauled off(lots of fiberglass and plastic and MDF mostly), the steel skeleton was left. Someone much later cut that up in many pieces and took it away.
 
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I wish the floor
In my house was a sturdy as the floor in our camper. 10 or 12” ibeam steel with all kinds of cross braces and 3/4” plywood bolted on top. Doesn’t flex anywhere. Lol
 
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I wish the floor
In my house was a sturdy as the floor in our camper. 10 or 12” ibeam steel with all kinds of cross braces and 3/4” plywood bolted on top. Doesn’t flex anywhere. Lol
That's funny for me, I'd take your house floor. Mine was built by either an idiot or a cheap bastard who hired idiots. The base floor is the normal 1/2" OSB, but over that is the cheap uncoated MDF/sawdust wood. It's got thousands of long straight staples, which lots of them squeak. Any moisture makes that wood grow, 1/4"-1/2" depending on how wet it gets. I have one bathroom that had a small faucet hose leak, water reached the back wall, floor edge under the cabinet. Three feet away in the floor, middle of the room, the floor grew, unevenly. I've got to gut that floor to replace all of that wood.

All moisture possible rooms should have treated wood floor base wood. So 3/4" should be under all floors of the kitchen all bathrooms, laundry room, and at door entrances. That might be 30% or more of some houses, how much more would it be to do all flooring in treated wood. Cheap bastards is my thought, you build a house for $100k, but save $500 or whatever on low quality flooring. I'm sure built right, my house would have cost a good $4000 more than it did.
 
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That's funny for me, I'd take your house floor. Mine was built by either an idiot or a cheap bastard who hired idiots. The base floor is the normal 1/2" OSB, but over that is the cheap uncoated MDF/sawdust wood. It's got thousands of long straight staples, which lots of them squeak. Any moisture makes that wood grow, 1/4"-1/2" depending on how wet it gets. I have one bathroom that had a small faucet hose leak, water reached the back wall, floor edge under the cabinet. Three feet away in the floor, middle of the room, the floor grew, unevenly. I've got to gut that floor to replace all of that wood.

All moisture possible rooms should have treated wood floor base wood. So 3/4" should be under all floors of the kitchen all bathrooms, laundry room, and at door entrances. That might be 30% or more of some houses, how much more would it be to do all flooring in treated wood. Cheap bastards is my thought, you build a house for $100k, but save $500 or whatever on low quality flooring. I'm sure built right, my house would have cost a good $4000 more than it did.
Yikes. What a nightmare. Shocked they would do particle board like that. Likely a contractor built home for spec sale I’m guessing.

Great idea for Treated wood floor base. However, I’m afraid that as it dried out it might cause more problems with shrinkage.

Mine is actual3/4” t&g plywood. Then 3/4” Bruce hardwood over that.
However, it’s nailed not screwed down. Lots and lots of squeaks. Going to tackle those squeaks very soon though. 23 years after we built it. Lol.
 

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Cool, I love over building things. I did my laundry room before I moved into the house. The old heater had leaked and "grown" the floor, and I wanted a gas model. I replaced four feet of the room, it's six feet wide.

It took 3/4" plywood(treated), and 1/4" Lauan board to get it close to matching the rest of the floor. That means the particle board had grown over 1/2" there. I installed gas lines under the house to the laundry room, and later installed a gas dryer also.

Back then it was suggested the water heater should be on a pedestal, so I put one under it. 15 years later that plastic pedestal cracked at the feet of the heater, making it lean like Pisa. So at Home Depot they never heard of those pedestals, couldn't replace it. I had some scrap 1/4" steel handy, and placed that under the bottom edge of the water heater, leveled it perfectly. But sometime I will have to replace it all, bring the heater down to the floor, and lengthen the heater pipes above it. More fun I forgot about, thanks.
 

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Love it. Once again - the human physical existence gets boiled down to its base elements - how to get water when we need it and how to keep it away from where we don't need it. ;)
 
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Cool, I love over building things. I did my laundry room before I moved into the house. The old heater had leaked and "grown" the floor, and I wanted a gas model. I replaced four feet of the room, it's six feet wide.

It took 3/4" plywood(treated), and 1/4" Lauan board to get it close to matching the rest of the floor. That means the particle board had grown over 1/2" there. I installed gas lines under the house to the laundry room, and later installed a gas dryer also.

Back then it was suggested the water heater should be on a pedestal, so I put one under it. 15 years later that plastic pedestal cracked at the feet of the heater, making it lean like Pisa. So at Home Depot they never heard of those pedestals, couldn't replace it. I had some scrap 1/4" steel handy, and placed that under the bottom edge of the water heater, leveled it perfectly. But sometime I will have to replace it all, bring the heater down to the floor, and lengthen the heater pipes above it. More fun I forgot about, thanks.
Most of them now go in a plastic pan now. Never seen pedestals.

Still running my original water heater from 1997 if you can believe that. Never even replaced an element. *Knocks furiously on wood.
 

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Laid out some lines on a piece of paper using plumb bob -- the back of the axle tubes is one line, and then measured to see where the front side of the Panhard hits right over by the shock on the driver's side. 3 1/8" off the axle line. So, mark a similar point on the passenger side and draw a line. That's where the center of my chassis bracket needs to be to keep the bar parallel to the axle at ride height. Set the needle over the line while the thread is centered on the bracket up above. Then mark where the bracket sits on the chassis.



Drill a couple of holes and temporarily fasten with sheet metal screws. Those two holes will become 7/16" (or 12mm) to bolt the bracket on.



With bracket in place, measure/cut the Panhard. Looks like it's going to work.





Also removed 3/4" lowering blocks - 1" blocks arrive tomorrow. Make up for the gas pressure shocks "lift". With blocks out, cut the shock mounting ears off the traction bars - passenger side may have interfered with the chassis bracket on a big compression. I think these traction bars were actually for a Toyota pickup. Once new blocks are in, I can measure for where to drill the holes in the chassis bracket to bolt the bar up. Also have to make some reinforcement plates for inside the trunk and one horizontal bar that will attach near the bottom of the chassis bracket and go over to the spare tire well --- to stabilize the bottom of the bracket.

 

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Lol! Wood floor pan made by a carpenter! Go figure.

Looks good Michael!
 

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Recall - he built this as a 'show car' (we carted a boat load of trophies into the trailer with the car) --- the floors in the trunk are solid as a rock. I think the upholsterer added the mdf just to smooth out the look of the carpeted trunk.
 

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Recall - he built this as a 'show car' (we carted a boat load of trophies into the trailer with the car) --- the floors in the trunk are solid as a rock. I think the upholsterer added the mdf just to smooth out the look of the carpeted trunk.
Have no doubt you are correct. MDF doesn’t warp like wood does. But is very heavy.
 

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This is the culprit for my intermittent working driverside HID. Bad connection. This goes right onto the bag of the bulb and is the igniter. One ear is bent and one is gone. So loose connection over time, arcing for each ignition and slowly corroded the connection amd melted part of the connector from heat.
 

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Wow - almost seems like the fit of the plastic was incorrect and over time it stressed/bent/broke the ears. Replaceable?

Got my 1" lowering blocks today. Quick work with 3/4" drill bit to open up the center holes on the bottom; and then transferred over my bespoke copper bushings for the top pin. Now I can reset ride height and measure for my Panhard rod mounting hole in the chassis bracket.

 

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The fit was fine. There are two waterproofing covers to insulate from moisture and it makes it for a blind fit and a bit awkward due to the rubber restricting movement. The previous owner likely fouled it up is my guess. It was tough to “feel” where to start the insert/turn and easy to get it slightly crooked if not careful. I was impressed with the retrofit on the lights though, they did a great job sealing them up. They’ve been together for 6+ years and holding up well. Being 55w projectors they really throw a great pattern. The field of view is amazing too since they use a 3” projector.
 
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