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I always use distilled and tell everyone I know to do the same. Water is cheap, radiators and heater cores aren’t.
 

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For sure.
 

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And, particularly if cast iron block, copper heater core and/or radiator, aluminum heads and/or radiator —- pick up a zinc anode from the local marine shop and drop it into the radiator or reservoir. The zinc is sacrificial - will give up its electrons before the other metals will. It will put an end to heater core jobs due to galvanic corrosion.
 

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Hadn’t even considered doing that on a car. Water heaters on campers (steel tank type) use those anode rods as standard practice. My water heater is an aluminum tank and has no anode rod.

Doesn’t the correct ratio of antifreeze protect against corrosion? Or did you mean if only running distilled water?
 

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If you keep the antifreeze changed regularly, you improve your odds. But as it ages, it becomes more likely to have the electrolyte properties (salts form) needed to allow the electrons to leave one metal and move to another. They want to leave the copper and aluminum first and be deposited onto the cast iron. With all aluminum block -- MUCH better odds as the potential for transfer between Cu and Al is much, much smaller than if iron is involved. Either way, zinc is your friend - cheap, cheap insurance. I've done 4 heater cores in my life. I hope I never have to do another.

Fired her up -- she came right up to 200F-210F, t'stat opened and she cooled down to about 198F. Car has a 13 lb cap -- no leaks anywhere. Drained the distilled and filled with 50/50 (roughly) antifreeze and distilled. Also have my overflow bottle working the way it should. Everything had been sucked out because I effectively had a leak into the car. And it was filthy inside/out. Cleaned it up -- almost looks like new! Dry as a bone inside. So I vacuumed and used my super/duper/spraying/sucking carpet cleaner to clean the rug. Letting it dry out overnight with fan blowing across it.
 

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Ditto the question here. I assumed distilled water was the be all and end all.
 

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Distilled water doesn't have the minerals that tap water does -- and those drop out of the water over time and can really clog up internal passages. If you've ever seen the inside of an old water heater you know what I mean. So distilled water is a good thing. But that has nothing to do with galvanic corrosion -- electron/material transfer between dis-similar metals through the medium of an electrolyte (old coolant) that will conduct a weak current.

 

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Makes sense. Now to fine one small enough to drop into the aluminum radiator.
 

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Well that seems a little extreme! Hacksaw a good radiator?
 

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Lol just kidding. Of course that makes sense. I’ll put pieces in other cars too!
 

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In the spirit of efficiency and repurposing stuff I already have - I used a piece of 5/16" silicone hose for the PCV line on the Corolla. It was leftover from the Volvo/LS3 project where it was used for a bit of the cooling system. When I made my vacuum "manifold" - I cut up that same piece of 5/16" and used it. The picture below is how much of it I had leftover when done. I thought that was pretty efficient - although Greta Thunberg would probably look at it and say "how dare you!"



CAUTION - FORD CONTENT! I remembered a trick from the Corolla I used to race. A Motorcraft/Ford FL-1A for a V8 is the same thread size/gasket size as the Corolla oil filter - but adds about 1/2 a qt. of capacity. Get almost a full 5 qts. in the little 1.8L with this filter.

 

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Sweet. Love the increased filter size.
 

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So far so good with rain this week since I plastic wrapped the house. This is temporary until my home builder friend comes out in an underground rubber sheet to drain water away from house better and some underground French drains it think they are called. But for now. .... dry basement.
 

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Was going ask on the water, Chris.

On the French drains, I HIGHLY recommend that have emitters and dump out on top of the ground away from the house.

The problem with a true French drain is that they simply dump into a large hole filled with rock. That hole eventually fills up and you are right back where you started. Guess how I know.

Michael - what about the debris from the anode rod disentigrating? Any time I pull mine out of the camper water heater, there is definitely debris left over.

Regarding the oil filter trick - I picked up a little extra capacity when going with the motorcraft FL910 on the geo. Just over 3.5q per change. :)
 

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Thanks for sharing the experience Richard. Yes thankfully I am on a good hill in the backyard and draining away will be easy. Just the three to six feet around the house is now flat to angled IN perhaps due to settling? I’ll keep an eye out to make sure we set it up right and avoid the trouble you had.

But yes, so far DRY basement. Thx!
 

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Settling for sure. I’ve got to excavate my French drain on the uphill side and have it be an emitter instead of a true drain. However, corner of house is 6’ deep and im not sure how far out, or the direction, of the drain line itself.
 

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Galvanic corrosion works just like chrome plating. Without the zinc anode, copper in the system becomes the sacrificial anode. The other metals act as the cathode and get “plated” with copper. Eventually enough copper leaves to create leak. The zinc anode takes the place of the copper. So stuff gets coated with zinc. As the zinc goes away, nothing leaks. Dis-similar metals are gonna give and take metal - so stuff is gonna get plated. You get to decide what plates what.
 

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All French drains "should" have an exit at one end if at all possible. Or at least one end tipped up to the atmosphere so that the water can evaporate faster between rains. I got lucky in that my father in law was a civil engineer and all of the brickwork at our house was designed and built by him. He had his own cement mixer. So all of the French drains have one end up out into the atmosphere and the other end down at the ground so that water can exit if it overflows. I had to do similar things at our previous home. Michael is right. The key to a good life is staying in front of water management.

Bought a dynomax cat back for the race car today for $100. Just needs cleaning and some good high temp paint. This is perfect for the car since dynomax is the best at following the stock routing and that helps with the MM suspension on the car.


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