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Discussion Starter #1
I know Strange struts clunk when used with MM CC Plates, but what about stock, Steeda, Hotchkiss or anything like that? I know the Team Z are designed to work with them, but I might have a line on a used set of Steedas. Also, I might just run the stocker cc plates for a little while, Im more concerned with getting rid of the 20 year old struts right now, but no way in hell will I accept any kind of clunking garbage.

Stangsuspension waited a bit to tell me that the Tokico Drag Struts I ordered were no longer available. :(

I might just get the regular illumina 5 ways or something, but keep going back to the Strange because of the price.
 

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I was told by Strange that the 10 ways make noise from valve slap in the strut. I got rid of mine and went with 70/30's and am happy with them on my daily driven fox. Just don't be suprised if you go with them and they do make noise.
 

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Damn it, not what Im wanting to hear. The price is right on them, but clunks are a no go for me. It's tempting to buy them and the Team Z cc plates, since they are supposed to work, but I would rather have Tokico. Now the issue is finding the drag struts used, or the regular illumina 5 ways for a decent price that arent on back order. Arrrg
 

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The Strange struts clunk when using CC plates that use a hard, spherical bushing in them because the shaft on the struts is just slightly smaller diameter.

I run the Strange struts with stock CC plates and no noise. I have ran them with MM CC plates and they made noise. I have heard that if you run them with aftermarket CC plates that use a spherical bushing specifically for them or with rubber or poly type bushing then they are quiet. I believe Hotchkiss use a poly bushing.
 

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Has nothing to do with shaft diameter. Has everything to do with noise transmitted through the solid bearing in the CC plate. The stock plate will eliminate this due to the rubber bushing built in.
 

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Has nothing to do with shaft diameter. Has everything to do with noise transmitted through the solid bearing in the CC plate. The stock plate will eliminate this due to the rubber bushing built in.
That's the first time I've heard that explanation. I first started using Strange 10ways about 6-7 years ago and back then the explanation was the shaft wasn't correctly sized with the bearing. The noise transmission would make sense too though.
 

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Has nothing to do with shaft diameter. Has everything to do with noise transmitted through the solid bearing in the CC plate. The stock plate will eliminate this due to the rubber bushing built in.
This is not true. Strange uses an undersized shaft compared to other struts. Therefore, there's a good .010" or so extra clearance between the strut shaft and spherical bushings that are designed for a standard sized strut shaft. I would agree that a solid bearing would transmit more NVH than a rubber bushing.

Team Z makes their bearings tighter to accommodate the undersized Strange shaft and reduce noise. I use this exact setup with no issues.

This is cut and paste from MM's site:

"Strange struts: For unknown reasons, Strange makes their strut shaft undersized. It is 0.619" in diameter instead of the standard Mustang size of 0.629" (16mm). This allows the strut shaft to move within the 16mm spherical bearing, causing noise, unless the strut shaft retaining nut is extremely tight."
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is not true. Strange uses an undersized shaft compared to other struts. Therefore, there's a good .010" or so extra clearance between the strut shaft and spherical bushings that are designed for a standard sized strut shaft. I would agree that a solid bearing would transmit more NVH than a rubber bushing.

Team Z makes their bearings tighter to accommodate the undersized Strange shaft and reduce noise. I use this exact setup with no issues.

This is cut and paste from MM's site:

"Strange struts: For unknown reasons, Strange makes their strut shaft undersized. It is 0.619" in diameter instead of the standard Mustang size of 0.629" (16mm). This allows the strut shaft to move within the 16mm spherical bearing, causing noise, unless the strut shaft retaining nut is extremely tight."
I read your threads about them. Do the Team Z pieces only work with Strange struts?

Come to think of it, my friend put Strange struts on his 93 Notch back in 07, and I dont recall any clunking, but I dont remember what caster/camber plates he had, I want to say none. I dont like the design of having to reach under the car to adjust them though vs on top like the Tokicos I have had.
 

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I read your threads about them. Do the Team Z pieces only work with Strange struts?

Come to think of it, my friend put Strange struts on his 93 Notch back in 07, and I dont recall any clunking, but I dont remember what caster/camber plates he had, I want to say none. I dont like the design of having to reach under the car to adjust them though vs on top like the Tokicos I have had.
I've wondered the same thing about standard struts in a Team Z plate. I really don't know to be honest. Too bad Strange can't just make their shafts standard size!

The Strange struts, while adjusted near the spindle, are still very easy to adjust. The rears are even easier. But on top is more convenient.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I agree on the rear Strange being easy, but the Tokicos are super easy under the hood, they suck when in the trunk of an SN95 though, prob be pretty easy in hatchback fox though heh. I just want some decent struts that arent totally drag, and getting Tokicos for a decent price is hard right now, so it's TEMPTING to try the Strange, but I hate clunks.
 

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What I posted is just what the rep. from Strange Engineering told me before giving me a full refund for my 10 ways. I told him I would try another pair or another set of cc plates. His words were that the noise is a known condition with their struts and there is no solution for it. His words were that it was "valve slap" in the strut (internal).

The Shaft diameter has no affect on the noise as once the nut is tightened down the shaft will not move in the plate hole anyways. I have put a dial indicator on the shaft to confirm this.
 

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What I posted is just what the rep. from Strange Engineering told me before giving me a full refund for my 10 ways. I told him I would try another pair or another set of cc plates. His words were that the noise is a known condition with their struts and there is no solution for it. His words were that it was "valve slap" in the strut (internal).

The Shaft diameter has no affect on the noise as once the nut is tightened down the shaft will not move in the plate hole anyways. I have put a dial indicator on the shaft to confirm this.
Interesting. Maybe each has a little to do with it.
 

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In all my years of studying suspension including several years of working closely with the engineers of one of the world's largest manufacturers of shocks and struts, I have never heard of shock/strut valves making a transmittable noise until Journeyman brought it up as a "maybe" a couple weeks ago. We can write it off as a possibility, it simply doesn't exist in any properly functioning damper. Even the ones that have auto-dynamically adjustable valves like Edelbrock EAS and Monroe Reflex don't make a transmittable sound.
 

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It is not a common fault (valve slap), however I also work a large european car dealership and I have also replaced about half a dozen struts/ shocks for the exct same cause/ noise. When the part is out and you compress the piston by hand you can actually feel a free spot with no dampening when you initially push it in. My Strange stuts did the same thing. My Lakewoods did not. This is not a possibility but a fact. Strange Engineering and our warranty dept. can verify this for you. :)
 

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Like I said...no properly functioning strut will make that noise. I highly doubt all Strange struts come from the factory with a warrantable repair condition, but the fact that their strut shafts are undersized is well documented. Therefore it's fair to say that the phenomenon of them clunking when installed with c/c plates right out of the box is not "valve slap".
 

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I'm going to add to this thread with my attempt at curing the noise. I bought a car that had Strange 10-ways on it and the frontend made all kinda noises which I've been successful at eliminating all but one clunk which happens on both sides of the frontend whenever I hit a bump. The car is stock height and has a UPR K-member with UPR lower A-arms and UPR Coilover kit with 14/175 springs with the Strange 10-ways. Here's my attempt at eliminating all clunking from the frontend which is pretty extensive.

1. Replaced bump steer kit that had spherical bearings with factory tie rod ends. Still made the clunk but eliminated this one noise.

2. Replaced Maximum Motorsport CC plates with factory CC plates modified on my lathe to fit the coilovers. With this modification there is ZERO metal to metal contact from the strut to the frame and it's all factory stuff on top now and 100% isolated from the frame. I also made a custom spacer that fit tight around the strut rod to eliminate any slop. Eliminated this one noise but the clunk is still present.

3. Cut the UPR A-arm bushings off the A-arms and welded larger bushings onto the A-arms. No difference. Still made the clunk which happens on both sides of the car.

4. Wrapped the coilover springs with rubber fuel line hose to keep the springs from hitting the strut. Still made the noise.

5.Wrapped strapping tape around strut and slid coilover sleeve down over the tape so coilover sleeve can't rattle against strut. Clunk still there.

6. Wrapped a lot of strapping tape around top of spring to isolate it from the coil spring "hat" so the top of the spring is not in contact with any metal. Clunk still there.

At this point my conclusion is that the clunk is internal to the struts. Nothing I did even quieted the noise one single bit. The clunk is just as loud now as it was when I started so I will probably sell these struts and put stock ones on it.

ks
 

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I know you said your at the stock ride height but did you check how much bump travel you actually have at that ride height?
With that low of a spring weight maybe even 2-2.5" is not enough to keep you off the bump stops,who knows.

When you had the MM plates installed was there at least one spacer on each side of the bearing,and that you hadn't ran out of threads before the strut rod was tight?

Is the spring or upper perch making contact with the inside of the strut tower or C/C plate bolts? i.e check the amount of spacer stack under the C/C plates with an inspection mirror while turning the wheels.I also use a thick piece of cardboard and slide it around up there making sure I have at least an 1/8" clearance between everything.

Just throwing out some ideas,you never know.

Good luck
 

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I have more than enough bump travel.
Since I installed the stock CC plates there is a lot of room around the spring and spring "hat".. Nothing is close to hitting up top.

A buddy spent 30 minutes listening for the noise while I drove up/down the driveway and it's isolated in the middle of the strut area not on top by the CC plates..

ks
 

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Just an update for the archives. I removed the Strange struts and put some stock struts on the car and the clunking noise is gone.

ks
 
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