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OK Ive done some reading about coilovers and have a couple questions. If a 800 lb. coil spring has a wheel rate of about 200lb. Then the coilover should be about 220lb. Then wouldnt the 300-350 lb. spring recomended for street use with some auto-x/ or road racing be on the stiff side? Also how does the spring length affect ride or performance? Say a 10" 300lb. spring vs. a 12" 300lb. spring? And after being told to stay away from the Granatelli kit's, how are D+D?
 

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Basically the length difference is not going to make a difference as far as ride quality is concerned. The potential drawback would be the potential for coil bind. The 300-350 spring rates are a broad range, but I would not consider them too firm for street cars depending on what type of ride quality you are looking for and what type of strut you are using. Some struts cannot handle something of that rate. You would be best off using a Bilstein strut. D&D stuff tends to be made over seas as well and they are on the cheap side. Dont forget, you get what you pay for.
 

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As Matt said, you get what you pay for.

The main factor in ride quality will be your dampeners (shocks/struts). I have been using 400# 8" springs with the MM Racevalved Bilsteins on my daily driver. The ride is firm, but not harsh.

If there was one lesson I could teach people, it would be not to cheap out on components. In the long run it could even cost more money with having to replace cheap parts with better parts. Build an attack plan and execute it when you can afford it. Since we were talking about Granatelli earlier, I will use ChrisRedV6's situation. If you havent searched and come across his numerous number of posts on the POS arms he had, here is a recap. After receiving his Granatelli weightjacker arms, he started noticing a few flaws like crappy bushings and problems with the spring adjusters. After complaining and no help from Granatelli (search will show some of this), he replaced the bushings with ones from MM and fixed the spring adjuster. After this he installed a MM panhard bar and didnt notice that the swaybar was in the incorrect location causing contact with the panhard bar under suspension compression. This caused a snap over steer that directed the car into a guard rail. He is now currently repairing the car and now has a set of MM control arms.
 

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Listen to the guys above, you definitely get what you pay for. I only go with M/M components, and they've never failed me. I just put my new coilover setup on with M/M Race Valved Bils, and even with a very high spring rate, the ride is not incredibly harsh for daily driving on So.Cal. streets. The quality of the damper and choosing the appropriate valving for the spring rate are key here. Ride quality evaluation is a very subjective thing, however, so I suggest that you ride in a few different setups before you buy. Hypercoil should have a reference table for their springs on their website, detailing amount of compression experienced before coil bind takes place.
 

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I'm running 350's up front and 250's out back, this is on a daily with a MM torque arm. For solo II, the setup is great, using a thinner front sway bar, the car dives excellent when entering a turn. But for big road courses, I actually think my setup is a bit on the soft side. The shocks/struts are Bilstein, and coils are Hypercoil. The ride is about 10x smoother then my old c-spring/KYB combo.
 
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