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Hello,
I have a 1996 GT that is getting way up there in mileage, but I gotta say the thing has been such a good car , good performance and super reliable . Car was purchased way back in 2001, belonged to a guy who worked at ford . I will have to look back at the specs/part #s but it’s got different heads , intake , cam, headers ,bassani X pipe,tune. He had the tech at ford do all the work . Ran really well for an N/A 2v .

So I’m trying to sort out a rough idea of options / how much work/ballpark of cost
I also figured I could get some good insight/opinions on these options

Option 1 ) rebuild the current 2V motor

Option 2) purchase a long block motor that would be an easy plug and play swap for the current 2v

Option 3) find a wrecked newer 5.0 and coyote swap the car along with 6 speed manual


Thanks!

Luke
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I was trying to figure out if the crank /rods were ok to re use ? I know some stuff is an absolute must to replace but some items aren’t . The car isn’t gonna be making enough power to really need super bulletproof block /crank /rods etc . Probably would be wasted money for this particular car .
Was just trying to see if I was trying keep the same setup but rebuilt how I could do it
 

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I'm interested in what you end up doing here as I'm kind of in the same position.
About to pull the 4.6 out of a '99 GT Convertible with a rod knock and zero oil pressure.:frown2:
 

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I bought a '96 Cobra as a hobby. The motor needs some work. What I found when researching my options was that to build the original motor to the power level I wanted would cost about the same as the new coyote motor. The coyote is already in the neighborhood of the power I want and it comes with factory level reliability. By all indications it's an amazing powerplant. I opted to go with a drivetrain on a pallet from Cleveland Power and Performance because I liked the price to mileage ratio and it comes with everything to start the motor on the pallet so you know it can be made to work in a car. But I made that decision after hours and hours of research over the course of months. I've not started putting it in my car yet but here are some things I knew I was getting into when I opted to go that route. In order to maximize my investment in the drivetrain I will be retrofitting the 2013 gauge cluster and ignition into my '96 along with the 2013 wiring harness. This will be very time consuming and fairly challenging. I will be using the 2013 fuel system to the greatest extent possible which will require a lot of modification. There are far simpler ways to handle the wiring and fuel system for a coyote swap to minimize the time and trouble involved but no matter the route you take with a coyote these will be added expenses after the cost of the engine that you wouldn't have if you refreshed your current engine. The biggest issue is the transmission. I didn't want to up the power level on the stock transmission whatever engine option I went with so I can't really consider this an additional cost as far as the swap goes but if you feel good about your transmission you could save some time and money on the swap by keeping it. I think with a new shifter the mt82 is a great transmission but it doesn't fit great in the sn95. I'm not there yet, but here are the issues I know for sure I'll have. First is going to be the cable to hydraulic issue for the clutch. It can be addressed, but it's more time and money. Some people have expressed concern that it may not even fit in the transmission tunnel. I think it will, but like I said, I'm not there yet. The main concern is getting a shifter for the mt82 to line up with the hole in the sn95. MGW makes a shifter for swaps (this means any of the many vehicles you may use this combo in, not fox or sn95 specifically) that puts it right at the end of the transmission but from my measurements this is still about 1 3/8" further back than stock. Stifflers makes a crossmember for the install but it looks to me that this crossmember was designed for the automatic transmission which happens to bolt up the same as the mt82. The reason I say that is because the pictures on the website are of the auto and I can't find anything on the internet detailing a successful mt82 swap into an sn95. I contacted MGW to confirm my measurements and even they told me that they couldn't confirm that information. I don't think this is any indication of their competence, they have a great product. I personally think that if the shifter sits 1 3/8" further back it'll be positioned just about perfect. If it doesn't line up close enough then I have the skillset to modify the tunnel and console if I need to and make it look good. This will all be acceptable for me because my position with this car is strictly hobby. I like to tinker and since I'm retired this will all keep my mind sharp. There's tons of those transmissions out there so there's good reasons everyone isn't using them for their swaps but if I do the work now then I've got access to a lot of parts that will be more within reach than a t56 if it needs replaced down the road. Also, all the information out there says don't even try and I don't like that answer. Someone should have information out there that says here's what it took to make it work, but I can't find it. Even LMR told me it won't fit, there are much better options. Again, great company, and they're right. The other thing about using the mt82 is that the 6th gear isn't going to gain you anything for top end or gas mileage. The additional gear is down low to help get the weight moving quicker. If you're thoughts are that you can get the benefits of a six speed for a bargain I think probably you'll be disappointed at how much you have to invest in the transmission that comes with the motor. The additional lower gear will be a lot of fun at stop lights probably but you won't spend much time in it from what I'm seeing. I have also yet to find a driveline offered to address this swap. The mt82 doesn't have a slip yoke so there has to be one in the driveshaft. You can have one made to suit this need, but again with the additional time and money thing. The cooling system is another factor to consider if this is a DD. It wasn't the best for '96 even for the demands placed on it then. If I were going to do a coyote swap to dd for the least amount of money and time I could then I would set a budget of no less than 10 grand. I could be totally wrong on any of these points but at least you can start considering options from where I currently am rather than where I was a couple years ago. The coyote swap is an awesome option but even if you have a good skillset for that kind of thing and even if you go the simplest route it isn't without it's challenges, even with all the great resources out there on this swap. If time or money, or both, are the slightest issue with this car I would go with option 1 or 2. It sounds like you've got some nice bolt on parts you can reuse and probably already have the PI heads from the sound of it. Considering this I think that if you find a good builder you can get a good bang for the buck with option 1, if bang for the buck is the priority. If you're in a position to tackle the mt82 option though, please post your progress so I can learn the easy way if you get there first! Hope it doesn't sound like I'm taking a poo poo on your idea just trying to save you some time if you're just getting into your research on that option. Good luck!
 

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Just do the Coyote swap. It seems like the logical thing to do as you already have a compatible k-member, and hydroboost brakes.

I wouldn't mind doing a trick flow top end 2v 4.6 either, but by the time you get done building it, you could have already put in a coyote 5.0 that's more powerful. I'd also do a hard pass on the Mt82 transmission. A T-45 will bolt right up to the 5.0, and that gives you the option of saving your money up for a T-56 swap down the road. That's exactly what one of my friends did with his 2v mustang and a coyote swap.

I view the 96-98 SN95's as the cheapest and easiest cars to make fast right now. They are lighter than all the new mustangs, and will be a lot faster simply with an engine swap. Plus I think they look a lot better than the new mustangs with a Cobra front bumper, and R hood... or a complete Saleen kit with a nice paint job.
 

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not to crash the party, but this conversation is being hashed a lot nowadays. yes a coyote swap is a good way to add power and upgrade, but really its not cheap, and there's always gremlins to work out with a swap unless you use a shop or know a guy that has done at least few. finding a cheap 2v shortblock and having it rebuilt adding better rods and pistons, having the pi heads ported then adding a supercharger can still be done for not as much money. Unless you are lucky and find a coyote motor on the cheap along with the trans...

there's lots of documented 2vs making over 400 hp with boost. I dunno do lots of searches and read, read, read. I 'd like to do a Coyote swap, but man the cost is just high. What is your budget, realistically?
 

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I would agree with all you points, you have to be pretty dedicated to solving the swap issues that come up or have a shop do all the work for you, which add a good amount of price to the project. I really want to do what you're doing, just not sure i could ever get the thing done, done.

I bought a '96 Cobra as a hobby. The motor needs some work. What I found when researching my options was that to build the original motor to the power level I wanted would cost about the same as the new coyote motor. The coyote is already in the neighborhood of the power I want and it comes with factory level reliability. By all indications it's an amazing powerplant. I opted to go with a drivetrain on a pallet from Cleveland Power and Performance because I liked the price to mileage ratio and it comes with everything to start the motor on the pallet so you know it can be made to work in a car. But I made that decision after hours and hours of research over the course of months. I've not started putting it in my car yet but here are some things I knew I was getting into when I opted to go that route. In order to maximize my investment in the drivetrain I will be retrofitting the 2013 gauge cluster and ignition into my '96 along with the 2013 wiring harness. This will be very time consuming and fairly challenging. I will be using the 2013 fuel system to the greatest extent possible which will require a lot of modification. There are far simpler ways to handle the wiring and fuel system for a coyote swap to minimize the time and trouble involved but no matter the route you take with a coyote these will be added expenses after the cost of the engine that you wouldn't have if you refreshed your current engine. The biggest issue is the transmission. I didn't want to up the power level on the stock transmission whatever engine option I went with so I can't really consider this an additional cost as far as the swap goes but if you feel good about your transmission you could save some time and money on the swap by keeping it. I think with a new shifter the mt82 is a great transmission but it doesn't fit great in the sn95. I'm not there yet, but here are the issues I know for sure I'll have. First is going to be the cable to hydraulic issue for the clutch. It can be addressed, but it's more time and money. Some people have expressed concern that it may not even fit in the transmission tunnel. I think it will, but like I said, I'm not there yet. The main concern is getting a shifter for the mt82 to line up with the hole in the sn95. MGW makes a shifter for swaps (this means any of the many vehicles you may use this combo in, not fox or sn95 specifically) that puts it right at the end of the transmission but from my measurements this is still about 1 3/8" further back than stock. Stifflers makes a crossmember for the install but it looks to me that this crossmember was designed for the automatic transmission which happens to bolt up the same as the mt82. The reason I say that is because the pictures on the website are of the auto and I can't find anything on the internet detailing a successful mt82 swap into an sn95. I contacted MGW to confirm my measurements and even they told me that they couldn't confirm that information. I don't think this is any indication of their competence, they have a great product. I personally think that if the shifter sits 1 3/8" further back it'll be positioned just about perfect. If it doesn't line up close enough then I have the skillset to modify the tunnel and console if I need to and make it look good. This will all be acceptable for me because my position with this car is strictly hobby. I like to tinker and since I'm retired this will all keep my mind sharp. There's tons of those transmissions out there so there's good reasons everyone isn't using them for their swaps but if I do the work now then I've got access to a lot of parts that will be more within reach than a t56 if it needs replaced down the road. Also, all the information out there says don't even try and I don't like that answer. Someone should have information out there that says here's what it took to make it work, but I can't find it. Even LMR told me it won't fit, there are much better options. Again, great company, and they're right. The other thing about using the mt82 is that the 6th gear isn't going to gain you anything for top end or gas mileage. The additional gear is down low to help get the weight moving quicker. If you're thoughts are that you can get the benefits of a six speed for a bargain I think probably you'll be disappointed at how much you have to invest in the transmission that comes with the motor. The additional lower gear will be a lot of fun at stop lights probably but you won't spend much time in it from what I'm seeing. I have also yet to find a driveline offered to address this swap. The mt82 doesn't have a slip yoke so there has to be one in the driveshaft. You can have one made to suit this need, but again with the additional time and money thing. The cooling system is another factor to consider if this is a DD. It wasn't the best for '96 even for the demands placed on it then. If I were going to do a coyote swap to dd for the least amount of money and time I could then I would set a budget of no less than 10 grand. I could be totally wrong on any of these points but at least you can start considering options from where I currently am rather than where I was a couple years ago. The coyote swap is an awesome option but even if you have a good skillset for that kind of thing and even if you go the simplest route it isn't without it's challenges, even with all the great resources out there on this swap. If time or money, or both, are the slightest issue with this car I would go with option 1 or 2. It sounds like you've got some nice bolt on parts you can reuse and probably already have the PI heads from the sound of it. Considering this I think that if you find a good builder you can get a good bang for the buck with option 1, if bang for the buck is the priority. If you're in a position to tackle the mt82 option though, please post your progress so I can learn the easy way if you get there first! Hope it doesn't sound like I'm taking a poo poo on your idea just trying to save you some time if you're just getting into your research on that option. Good luck!
 

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I bought a '96 Cobra as a hobby. The motor needs some work. What I found when researching my options was that to build the original motor to the power level I wanted would cost about the same as the new coyote motor. The coyote is already in the neighborhood of the power I want and it comes with factory level reliability. By all indications it's an amazing powerplant. I opted to go with a drivetrain on a pallet from Cleveland Power and Performance because I liked the price to mileage ratio and it comes with everything to start the motor on the pallet so you know it can be made to work in a car. But I made that decision after hours and hours of research over the course of months. I've not started putting it in my car yet but here are some things I knew I was getting into when I opted to go that route. In order to maximize my investment in the drivetrain I will be retrofitting the 2013 gauge cluster and ignition into my '96 along with the 2013 wiring harness. This will be very time consuming and fairly challenging. I will be using the 2013 fuel system to the greatest extent possible which will require a lot of modification. There are far simpler ways to handle the wiring and fuel system for a coyote swap to minimize the time and trouble involved but no matter the route you take with a coyote these will be added expenses after the cost of the engine that you wouldn't have if you refreshed your current engine. The biggest issue is the transmission. I didn't want to up the power level on the stock transmission whatever engine option I went with so I can't really consider this an additional cost as far as the swap goes but if you feel good about your transmission you could save some time and money on the swap by keeping it. I think with a new shifter the mt82 is a great transmission but it doesn't fit great in the sn95. I'm not there yet, but here are the issues I know for sure I'll have. First is going to be the cable to hydraulic issue for the clutch. It can be addressed, but it's more time and money. Some people have expressed concern that it may not even fit in the transmission tunnel. I think it will, but like I said, I'm not there yet. The main concern is getting a shifter for the mt82 to line up with the hole in the sn95. MGW makes a shifter for swaps (this means any of the many vehicles you may use this combo in, not fox or sn95 specifically) that puts it right at the end of the transmission but from my measurements this is still about 1 3/8" further back than stock. Stifflers makes a crossmember for the install but it looks to me that this crossmember was designed for the automatic transmission which happens to bolt up the same as the mt82. The reason I say that is because the pictures on the website are of the auto and I can't find anything on the internet detailing a successful mt82 swap into an sn95. I contacted MGW to confirm my measurements and even they told me that they couldn't confirm that information. I don't think this is any indication of their competence, they have a great product. I personally think that if the shifter sits 1 3/8" further back it'll be positioned just about perfect. If it doesn't line up close enough then I have the skillset to modify the tunnel and console if I need to and make it look good. This will all be acceptable for me because my position with this car is strictly hobby. I like to tinker and since I'm retired this will all keep my mind sharp. There's tons of those transmissions out there so there's good reasons everyone isn't using them for their swaps but if I do the work now then I've got access to a lot of parts that will be more within reach than a t56 if it needs replaced down the road. Also, all the information out there says don't even try and I don't like that answer. Someone should have information out there that says here's what it took to make it work, but I can't find it. Even LMR told me it won't fit, there are much better options. Again, great company, and they're right. The other thing about using the mt82 is that the 6th gear isn't going to gain you anything for top end or gas mileage. The additional gear is down low to help get the weight moving quicker. If you're thoughts are that you can get the benefits of a six speed for a bargain I think probably you'll be disappointed at how much you have to invest in the transmission that comes with the motor. The additional lower gear will be a lot of fun at stop lights probably but you won't spend much time in it from what I'm seeing. I have also yet to find a driveline offered to address this swap. The mt82 doesn't have a slip yoke so there has to be one in the driveshaft. You can have one made to suit this need, but again with the additional time and money thing. The cooling system is another factor to consider if this is a DD. It wasn't the best for '96 even for the demands placed on it then. If I were going to do a coyote swap to dd for the least amount of money and time I could then I would set a budget of no less than 10 grand. I could be totally wrong on any of these points but at least you can start considering options from where I currently am rather than where I was a couple years ago. The coyote swap is an awesome option but even if you have a good skillset for that kind of thing and even if you go the simplest route it isn't without it's challenges, even with all the great resources out there on this swap. If time or money, or both, are the slightest issue with this car I would go with option 1 or 2. It sounds like you've got some nice bolt on parts you can reuse and probably already have the PI heads from the sound of it. Considering this I think that if you find a good builder you can get a good bang for the buck with option 1, if bang for the buck is the priority. If you're in a position to tackle the mt82 option though, please post your progress so I can learn the easy way if you get there first! Hope it doesn't sound like I'm taking a poo poo on your idea just trying to save you some time if you're just getting into your research on that option. Good luck!
Have you ever heard of paragraphs? I think this is the Great Wall of Text. I didn't even try to read this.
 

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I am a firm believer of the trick flow head cam kit as they really make a huge difference. A nice saleen blower kit would make great power too.
I tend to keep things simple and reliable and do not like to add too much stuff around the motor so I builted mine N/A . (got a 5.4 2v tho )
 

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I had an 03 mach 1 that dyno'd stock with just an x and cat back at 286rwhp. I never got to put gears in it, but that ran nice. So, even with 300 whp these cars are pretty quick. Just saying. I like the simple route also!
 
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