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Old 08-13-2008, 12:03 PM   #1
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Preventing electrolysis with an aluminum radiator?

I'm about to install an aluminum rad. I've heard of people using sacrifical anodes in the caps or the drain plugs to help prevent electrolysis, others say it's unnecessary. Meanwhile my new rad came with a short black wire with an eye ring on each end...ground wire? Is this all I need, or are further steps required, beyond the obvious use of distilled water in the mix?
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:28 PM   #2
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Electrolysis

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Originally Posted by MFE View Post
I'm about to install an aluminum rad. I've heard of people using sacrificial anodes in the caps or the drain plugs to help prevent electrolysis, others say it's unnecessary. Meanwhile my new rad came with a short black wire with an eye ring on each end...ground wire? Is this all I need, or are further steps required, beyond the obvious use of distilled water in the mix?
I have a ground from the engine to the rad support and the rad cap run straight distilled water with water wetter for years and not much electrolysis I clean the anode once a month and replace when wore out. the ground wire must be something new they have added.



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Old 08-13-2008, 12:32 PM   #3
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What anode do you have?
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:36 PM   #4
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Clean and check every ground in the engine compartment,and use the ground wire that is supplied with the rad.Good clean grounds prevent any stray voltage from creting electrolysis.
Distilled water is always a good idea.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:38 PM   #5
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Anode

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What anode do you have?
Just the one that comes with the stock Rad cap unless you are referring to something else. I always thought that what it is called correct me if I am mistaken




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Old 08-13-2008, 01:05 PM   #6
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what the hell is electrolysis? i've never heard of it, and im running an aluminum radiator, so maybe it concerns me?
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Old 08-13-2008, 01:25 PM   #7
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yes, more details - as I too am running an aluminum rad and have never really seen or heard of these supposed issues...

MFE - what aluminum rad did you purchase that came w/ the ground wires?

What is the theory behind this electrolysis - for those of us who have been using an alumninum rad for YEARS w/o the grounding techniques or anodes as discussed above?
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Old 08-13-2008, 01:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobra Jet NJ View Post
yes, more details - as I too am running an aluminum rad and have never really seen or heard of these supposed issues...

MFE - what aluminum rad did you purchase that came w/ the ground wires?

What is the theory behind this electrolysis - for those of us who have been using an alumninum rad for YEARS w/o the grounding techniques or anodes as discussed above?
^^^^^^^^^^^^
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Old 08-13-2008, 02:34 PM   #9
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Electrolysis probably isn't the correct term, it's a galvanic corrosion process which is an electro-chemical process. The same principle behind what makes a car battery produce voltage (dissimilar metals and the electrical potential they produce in the presence of an electrolyte) works in reverse to cause corrosion of dissimilar metals in the presence of a charged electrolyte.

Ever heard of sacrificial anodes on boats with aluminum props/stern drives? The anode, which is made of magnesium or zinc and is easily and inexpensively replaceable, corrodes (is sacrificed) in order to keep the aluminum prop/stern drive/etc from corroding due to galvanic reaction. Without the sacrificial anode, the aluminum is the anode, and is eaten first.

I don't want my radiator eaten due to galvanic reaction with the iron in the engine using the coolant as a conductor.

Ever notice how hard it is to get steel bolts out of aluminum threads if they've been there long? Galvanic reaction at work.

From wikipedia:

Quote:
Galvanic corrosion is an electrochemical process in which one metal corrodes preferentially when in electrical contact with a different type of metal and both metals are immersed in an electrolyte.
Quote:
When two or more different sorts of metal come into contact in the presence of an electrolyte a galvanic couple is set up as different metals have different electrode potentials. The electrolyte provides a means for ion migration whereby metallic ions can move from the anode to the cathode. This leads to the anodic metal corroding more quickly than it otherwise would; the corrosion of the cathodic metal is retarded even to the point of stopping. The presence of electrolyte and a conducting path between the metals may cause corrosion where otherwise neither metal alone would have corroded.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_corrosion

Last edited by MFE; 08-13-2008 at 02:39 PM.
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Old 08-13-2008, 02:55 PM   #10
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I've seen electrolysis eat right thru the engine block of
a big diesel engine.

It's also one of the reasons our heater cores corrode so fast.

Ground, Ground, Ground and Ground some more.
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Old 08-13-2008, 06:55 PM   #11
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but if we back up a bit, most newer vehicles come w/ aluminum radiators and of course some still have iron blocks/heads too... Does this happen to all such radiators - and if so, why would'nt the manufacturer of the vehicle take the next step in grounding those units too?

I'm not trying to be sarcastic or argumentive, just trying to figure out why if the vehicle came from the factory as such, that you don't see these additional grounds or anodes on those factory installed units?

Does this only apply to a 100% aluminum radiator, or also those that are aluminum cores but plastic tanks? I also thought that if the radiator is isolated from the metal core support by use of rubber pads or blocks (as most vehicles have), that this type of corrosion would not be an issue? Doesn't this explain why most of the upper and lower rad holders have rubber pads pressed into them?

Also, what does the anode look like and where do you buy them?
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Old 08-13-2008, 07:08 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobra Jet NJ View Post
but if we back up a bit, most newer vehicles come w/ aluminum radiators and of course some still have iron blocks/heads too... Does this happen to all such radiators - and if so, why would'nt the manufacturer of the vehicle take the next step in grounding those units too?

I'm not trying to be sarcastic or argumentive, just trying to figure out why if the vehicle came from the factory as such, that you don't see these additional grounds or anodes on those factory installed units?

Does this only apply to a 100% aluminum radiator, or also those that are aluminum cores but plastic tanks? I also thought that if the radiator is isolated from the metal core support by use of rubber pads or blocks (as most vehicles have), that this type of corrosion would not be an issue? Doesn't this explain why most of the upper and lower rad holders have rubber pads pressed into them?

Also, what does the anode look like and where do you buy them?

MFE should know what anode looks like.

http://www.radcapproducts.net/radcap.html
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Old 08-13-2008, 07:59 PM   #13
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Cobra Jet NJ,

I don't know why auto manufactures don't put a ground strap to the alum radiators -maybe they figure it'll outlast the warranty?

I think the rubber pads are to allow a bit of movement for thermal expansion/contraction.

The radiator fluid is an electrolyte and acts as a conduit for electrons/ions to migrate -aka as current flow. This causes corrosion -most will occur in the more electrically active metal.
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Old 08-13-2008, 08:44 PM   #14
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so is the same to be said if you have an aluminum intake or aluminum heads?
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Old 08-13-2008, 08:55 PM   #15
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I deal with this problem all the time. C-vics f series trucks and explorers suffer from galvanic corrosion/electolysis the most. i''ve replace 4 heater cores in the same crown vic police car. every time i tried something different first time just a replacement. second time i put a ground strap on the heater cor nad the rad. 3rd time i put a brass restricter in the feed line to the heater core. 4th time i put a lead wheel weight in the radiator attached to the cap by copper wire. the car has now been to the dealership for 2 years with the same heater core. The Sacraficial lead wheel weight is getting smaller and smaller. but no more heater cores. In my eyes i think the anode is the best choice but grounding is a good idea as well
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:09 PM   #16
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I've never seen a cap like that but I have a feeling I'll be getting one soon
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Old 08-13-2008, 11:10 PM   #17
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I'm trying to help a friend with this issue right now.

I've been helping him build a dedicated road race car. I installed the radiator the first week of June (aluminum, by Northern) and filled the cooling system with distilled water and a bottle of water wetter. We put around 2 hours on the motor before the dyno, an hour on the dyno, then 3 hours on it's first track day. Last weekend he calls me and says the radiator is leaking. I pull the radiator, fill it with water and see 2 or 3 leaks. Bring it to a radiator shop to have it tested (and see if it can be repaired) and they found a dozen pinholes. They attributed the cause to be electrolysis. The car was built from the ground up using all new parts.

We've got another track event in two weeks so I re-installed the stock (copper core) radiator for now. He understandably doesn't want to spend $400+ on another aluminum radiator until we understand the root cause and come up with a fix. My aluminum radiator has been in my race car for years. His lasted a few weeks.

I should have done the voltage measurements between the coolant and different ground points (the block, the frame, maybe the - side of the battery) but it's too late for the aluminum unit. I'll try taking some measurements this Friday on the copper radiator.
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Old 08-14-2008, 12:57 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Booost? View Post
so is the same to be said if you have an aluminum intake or aluminum heads?
To some degree, yes, but there's so much less surface exposure to electrolytes, and so much more substantial the material base with those parts that I imagine it's just not much of an issue. It remains an issue with fasteners, though, which is why it can be such a bitch to remove the stock upper intake on a 5.0 if it's old and never been done. Or the starter, where in Ford's penny-pinching wisdom they installed it using 1/2-inch head, steel bolts into aluminum holes, uncoated.
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Old 09-20-2009, 02:09 PM   #19
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Okay, I know this is old but I just installed the radiator that SteveL1994 installed (Summit Direct fit aluminum built by Northern). I was doing a search trying to figure out if I should put distilled water in it or not because I am hearing a bunch of conflicting information about that. I used distilled, but then I read my bottle of Purple Ice and it says NOT to use distilled water in an aluminum radiator. So, what is the deal with distilled or tap water?

Then, I come across this message about grounding the radiator and putting lead in it! WTF should I do? I definitely don't want this new radiator to leak. This radiator did not come with a ground strap and I am using my old radiator cap. Do I need to get a special radiator cap? If so, anyone have a part number? Is it better to isolate the radiator with the rubber mounts so it does not have a current path or should it be grounded? I am using the rubber grommets, but the front of the radiator is in contact with the front cross bar that the radiator clamps to. I could just file off the paint at the point where it comes in contact and that would ground it.

I am now confused and don't know what to do. I thought I was done with this project! Well, I haven't added the Purple Ice yet because it said not to put it in a NEW Radiator.

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Old 09-21-2009, 03:44 AM   #20
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wow, this is an old thread, but you guys should NOT ground the radiator. That will provide a path to ground for the electrolysis to take place.

More often then not, the heater core is the first to go because of electrolysis. Which is why some techs started grounding the heater cores when they installed new ones. Ford issued a TSB about this, saying NOT to do it.

Best thing to do, flush your coolant system when you are supposed to and use the anode. That is all you need to do.
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Old 09-21-2009, 03:47 AM   #21
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http://www.modularfords.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=94083

Tsb 06-21-19 Heater Core Leakage And Electrolysis (information Only)

FORD:
1997-2002 Contour
1997-2007 Crown Victoria, Mustang, Taurus
2000-2007 Focus
2002-2005 Thunderbird
2005-2007 Five Hundred, Freestyle
2006-2007 Fusion
1997-1999 F-250 Light Duty
1997-2003 Windstar
1997-2007 E-Series, Expedition, Explorer, F-150, F-53 Motorhome Chassis, F-Super Duty, Ranger
2000-2005 Excursion
2001-2003 Explorer Sport
2001-2007 Escape, Explorer Sport Trac
2004 F-150 Heritage
2004-2007 Freestar
2005-2007 Escape Hybrid
1999-2007 F-650, F-750LINCOLN:
1997-2002 Continental
1997-2007 Town Car
2000-2006 Lincoln LS
2006 Zephyr
2007 MKZ
1998-2007 Navigator
2002-2003 Blackwood
2003-2005 Aviator
2006-2007 Mark LTMERCURY:
1997-2002 Cougar, Mystique
1997-2005 Sable
1997-2007 Grand Marquis
2005-2007 Montego
2006-2007 Milan
1997-2002 Villager
1997-2007 Mountaineer
2005-2007 Mariner
2006-2007 Mariner Hybrid


This article supersedes TSB 01-15-6 to update the vehicle model years and Service Procedure. ISSUE:

The majority of repeat heater core leaks are due to high flow rate or use of poor quality coolant. However, electrolysis should also be checked, especially when repeat repairs have occurred.
ACTION:

If the heater core is leaking, review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant.
SERVICE PROCEDURE


1.Review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant:
1. If leaks are found on the inlet (or outlet) tubes entering /exiting the heater core, it is most likely due to due to high flow rate - replace the heater core and install a restrictor in the heater hose closest to the engine block, reference Workshop Manual, Section 412.
2. If leaks are found in the body of the heater core itself, and does not appear to be the result of physical damage like contact or puncture, check the coolant for possible electrolysis.

Testing For Electrolysis



Check for voltage in the cooling system by touching the negative contact of a voltmeter to the battery ground or a known good ground and suspend the positive lead in the coolant, making sure it is in contact with the coolant but not touching any metal part of the radiator or cooling system. Both AC and DC voltages must be checked. Vehicles normally have DC voltages; however, a faulty engine block heater or faulty diode in the alternator can produce AC voltages. It is understood that coolant is lost due to heater core failure but try to obtain a voltage reading on the old coolant in the engine block before addition to or replacement of. To keep more coolant from exiting the heater core clamp off heater core lines and measure coolant in the engine block. Try not to dilute the original coolant with new coolant during testing if possible.

1. Determine whether coolant condition is acceptable.
1. Remove both cables from the battery and ensure they do not contact each other or the vehicle.
2. Touch negative lead of voltmeter to engine ground and positive lead in the coolant.
NOTE:POSITIVE TEST PROBE IS IN THE COOLANT FOR TESTING.
3. Check the voltage in the cooling system. If less than or equal to 0.4 volts (V) OK, reconnect battery cables and proceed to Step 2.
4. If greater than 0.4 V, flush cooling system thoroughly.
5. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
6. Reconnect battery cables.
7. Refill the system with appropriate Motorcraft® engine coolant.

2. Check for loose or missing grounds at static conditions.
1. Turn off all accessories. Turn ignition on but do not start engine.
2. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
3. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V on all grounds OK.
4. Any one greater than 0.4 V, check and clean ground cable connections.
5. Check accessories without using the on off switch on the vehicle instrument panel, use a jumper wire to ground.
6. Plug in engine block heater, if equipped, and test.
7. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.
8. Unplug engine block heater, if equipped.

3. Check for loose, missing, or inadequate grounds.
1. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
2. Crank engine but do not start.
3. Monitor voltage while cranking. less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
4. If greater than 0.4 V, ground or repair starter.
5. Start engine and run at about 2000 rpm.
6. Turn on all accessories including those customer only uses occasionally such as CB radio, cell phone, etc.
7. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.
8. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V OK
9. If greater than 0.4 V, turn off one item at a time until V drops to less than or equal to 0.4 V. Repair ground to the accessory just identified.
10. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V
11. Turn the DVOM to AC volts.
12. Check for ANY AC voltage greater than 0.4.
13. If any AC voltage is present then try turning off each accessory one at a time including blower motor and any fan motors.
14. If AC voltage is still present then shut engine off and remove B+ from the alternator and tape it up then retest.
15. If voltage drop is gradual to less than or equal to 0.4 V, the ground straps may simply be overloaded by added accessories. Test by using heavy gauge jumper to ground. If indicated, install heavier gauge ground strap(s) and recheck.
NOTE:If vehicle is equipped with electric cooling fans, be sure they cycle during this testing and monitor voltage when they are on and when off.

CAUTION: DO NOT GROUND HEATER CORE. IF THE HEATER CORE IS GROUNDED, YOU HAVE PROVIDED THE ELECTROLOSIS A PATH THROUGH THE HEATER CORE. THIS WOULD CAUSE THE HEATER CORE TO BECOME AN ANODE OR RECEIVER AND IT WOULD PROMOTE THE ELECTROLOSIS, OR ANY STRAY VOLTAGE TO USE THE COOLANT AS THE GROUND PATH.

4. Refill the engine cooling system, reference Workshop Manual, Section 303-03.

NOTE: IF THE HEAT OUTPUT IS INSUFFICIENT, OR THE ENGINE DOES NOT REACH NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURES, VERIFY PROPER THERMOSTAT OPERATION AND REPEAT PROCEDURE IF REQUIRED.

WARRANTY STATUS:

Eligible Under Provisions Of New Vehicle Limited Warranty Coverage
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Old 09-21-2009, 10:28 AM   #22
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Thanks for the info.

Can you give me a little more on the anode? What exactly is it and where do I get one?

Any info on whether or not distilled water should be used in an aluminum radiator? I have read a bunch of conflicting info on that one. I thought distilled would be better until I Royal Purple said not to use it in an aluminum radiator.

Thanks,
Craig
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Old 09-21-2009, 10:54 AM   #23
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where can one get the anode? is it in the cap, or drain area?

thanks.
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:05 AM   #24
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From a similar thread:
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverFoxbody View Post
Okay, here is the answer – I think, and I believe it.
I work as an electronics buyer (but not the best electrician as you can see) and I got into a long winded conversation with the electronic engineer….here goes.

Ground wire – probably included for you 5 speed guys who don’t have auto cooling lines and have rubber mounts to hold the rad. WHY GROUND THE RAD – if the rad is neutral so to say, AIR passing through it will cause static electricity build up very quickly. Without a way to dissipate this static energy the rad would be become a large mass of static and build up to the point it would want to arc to the nearest grounded source. This large spike would surely cause damage to today sensitive electronics.

Electrolyte – the coolant, basically it is full of crud that can become electrically charged and carries electrons. VERY SLOWELY, but still a conductor in low low voltage carrying potential. If it was SALT WATER we all know it would be a much better conductor and carry more charges.

Galvanic corrosion – in terms of alum rad vs. steel block, the TABLE OF ELECTROCHEMICAL POTENTIALS says these two dissimilar metals will generate 0.2 volts in the presence of a perfect electrolyte or conductor. Galvanic corrosion is ALWAYS PRESENT and can only be stopped by some kind of medium at a molecular level that prevents ions from one metal to reach the other metal – like an isolator, or a perfect vacuum at the ultimate level.

ELECTONEGATIVITY – in terms of galvanic corrosion is the potentials (chart somewhere on the net I am sure) that says one metal will give up ion to another metal – in other terms one metal will be + and the other -. The more electrochemically dissimilar the more volts and corrosion that will occur in the system. The + metal will give ions to the neg metal. This + metal is the metal that is corroded.

I am not sure, however we are in belief that the aluminum rad is the more + in the system and gives up more free ions in the galvanic reaction – causing oxidation (aka rust – aka corrosion).

Is you radiator corroded due to this galvanic reaction….doubt it. The corrosion process is very very slow – but yes it does cause corrosion.

Why is your radiator corroded….mostly due to the free ions in the electrolyte. TAP water is a killer….we all use it at some point. There is a lot of potential on the water for electrochemical processes and free ions to jump start corrosion.

DEIONIZED WATER – yes yes yes – de-ionized water has LESS or NO free ions to give up creating corrosion. If the electrolyte was PERFECTLY DE IONIED (not really possibly) then galvanic corrosion would be the only possible reason for corrosion. Note that a perfectly sealed cooling system from the factory with all the anti corrosion stuff and deionized electrolyte seems to stay pretty dang clean for a long long time.

An isolated or neutral rad (no ground wire) would be MUCH LESS likely to corrode due to galvanic corrosion. This is because the path of ions must flow through the electrolyte – there is no ground wire to make the path of least resistance. But as mentioned, the static that could build up could kill your precious MSD units. I know I burnt up a MSD by welding on my car – says so in the manual 

ANODE – GOOD IDEA, an ideal sacrificial anode will more electrochemical reactive than the other metal components in the system you wish to protect. On the scale of electrochemical potentials the best sacrificial metal would be one that it willing to give up ions more readily than the next best thing…the aluminum or brass rad we assume.
Also this sacrificial anode must be grounded to one of the metals in the system to work….if too much corrosion occurs and this ground is loosened, it will no longer be an anode – just crap you hung/screwed in.

On my chart I found – take this with a grain of salt – it appears that LEAD will give up .35v to the ALUM and .15v to the STEEL – that is good. However the ALUM will give up to the STEEL .2 as mentioned above. I am going to ASSUME that since the alum is pulling .35 from the LEAD and the STEEL is pulling .2 from the ALMN, there is a surplus and the alum will not corrode.

Whew….any questions?
Cliff notes:
yes ground your rad to save electronics and noise in electronic systems
yes a sacrificial anode is a good idea, be sure it is grounded in the cooling system
yes use deionized water or at least distiled pure water
DO NOT USED over pure water that will suck ions from the metals.
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Old 09-21-2009, 11:19 AM   #25
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MFE, thanks for the info. So, what did you do? Did you ground your radiator and add a chunk of grounded lead? If so, how did you install the grounded chunk of lead? Did you use a wheel weight?

Thanks.
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Old 09-21-2009, 12:00 PM   #26
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I grounded the radiator, and bought an anode that's supposed to go in the drain hole. But the threads are different and I never did fine an adapter. Thought about hanging it from the cap into the coolant, never finished
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Old 09-21-2009, 02:19 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need-a-cage View Post

Any info on whether or not distilled water should be used in an aluminum radiator? I have read a bunch of conflicting info on that one. I thought distilled would be better until I Royal Purple said not to use it in an aluminum radiator.

Thanks,
Craig
I don't see how distilled water could hurt anything. It's just water with the minerals (and perhaps other stuff) distilled out. The minerals are what make water conduct electricity, so distilled water should not conduct.
I'm only just now getting my car going, but I'm definitely using distilled water with my alum heads and alum radiator.
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Old 09-21-2009, 02:30 PM   #28
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I think that I will just isolate the radiator and use distilled water. If you use premix 50/50, what is in that? I got some of that cheap and then added some distilled to drop it to a 30/70 mix to aid in cooling.

I think I will also isolate the radiator and take my chances with the static electricity.

After a while, I may also try to check the voltages as explained above.

Thanks
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Old 07-31-2012, 07:57 PM   #29
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I had an issue with electrolysis and did some research, myself. An article published by Car Craft highlights the pros and cons to using distilled water here How to Design And Build A High-Performance Cooling System - How To - Car Craft Magazine

Read the Coolant Chronicles section. Says that soft water is best. Distilled is a "hungry" water.

Quote:
According to Jay Ross at Applied Chemical Specialties, the best water to use is soft water. Distilled water is not a good idea because distillation strips ions from the water. When it is introduced into the cooling system, the natural chemical-balance process will pull the ions from light metals such as aluminum or magnesium that are exposed to the water. This ion transfer greatly enhances the corrosion process called electrolysis. Soft water is treated with sodium chloride that replaces the lost ions and minimizes the electrolysis process. If soft water is not available, then bottled water or tap water is the next best solution. If you insist on distilled water, Ross says mixing it 50/50 with antifreeze will pull ions from the antifreeze rather than from your cooling system itself.
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Old 07-31-2012, 08:35 PM   #30
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I've always been told to use distilled water treated with a small pinch of kosher salt. If you insist on using distilled water alone on a new cooling system fill, you should always pour in the majority of the fresh coolant first, then add the remaining portion of distilled water. That way the water will balance itself with the coolant additives first instead of reacting to the metals.

Another very important thing to avoid is grounding ANYTHING on aluminum heads. ALWAYS ground the battery and other electrical items to the engine block, NEVER to the intake or cylinder heads. If I work on a vehicle with electrolysis issues I almost always find the cause to be the starter grounding. A weak starter ground will pull a ton of current through the cooling system if the coolant is worn out and/or if any of the engine accessories are "double grounded". I've even seen headgaskets get eaten away. The best way to guarantee an electrolysis free cooling system is to verify all your grounds are connected to a central piece of large metal (i.e. engine block). Sacrificial anodes are a bandaid, not a solution.
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Old 08-01-2012, 09:42 AM   #31
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"Sacrificial anodes are a bandaid, not a solution." No doubt that correct grounding procedures are desired -- for a variety of reasons beyond dealing with galvanic corrosion. But any time you have dis-similar metals in a common salt solution (which antifreeze provides) you've created a 'battery' and you're going to have galvanic corrosion. Proper grounding techniques won't stop that. Improper grounding techniques can simply make it worse. The only way to prevent metal loss from eating away at aluminum or copper somewhere in the system is with a sacrificial anode. So -- the solution is BOTH a sacrificial anode and proper grounding.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:08 AM   #32
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Bring on the sacrifices
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Old 08-03-2012, 04:15 PM   #33
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wow. blast from the past.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:54 PM   #34
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OLD thread here but:

Quote:
Another very important thing to avoid is grounding ANYTHING on aluminum heads. ALWAYS ground the battery and other electrical items to the engine block, NEVER to the intake or cylinder heads.
The battery ground always is grounded at the block and body but
I've been an Import tech for years (like 34 now) and every car that I see comes with aluminum core radiators (plastic side tanks, rubber mounts), no anodes, no ground wires. Never heard of Anode usage with cars (Outboards, Water heaters....yes).
Imports use various other ground wires attached to blocks (iron and aluminum), aluminum cyl heads and aluminum intake manifolds.

Aluminum components are nothing new to imports, used since (at least) the 70s.

They require no special coolants (sure, come manufacture specific but it's not essential if you ever wanted to use something else these days) and I've not once see any unusual metal transfer on any component. Many of their cars, including my own last 20+ yrs, 200+ miles on original parts so I fail to see a concern or problem, at least in my experience unless for some odd reason Fords are that much different?

When we mix pure coolant and water at work, we just use tap water.

My Mustang has an all aluminum radiator, aluminum heads and intake, regular coolant (has for 10 yrs now too), no problems.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:24 PM   #35
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I was kind of chuckling at the 'never attach to an aluminum head'. Attach to the cast iron block. The block is attached to the head. Electrons don't care as long as they have a path. Makes no difference which it's attached to when those two parts are attached to each other.....
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